Siv Grytten
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Sixteenth-Century Pockets by Rebecca Unsworth | Unmaking Things .....hmmm...inside pocket

Sixteenth-Century Pockets Drawing of a leather jerkin found on the Mary Rose with a flap-top pocket on the inside of the skirt © Rebecca Unsworth

Extremely rare survival of a shirt and breeches, called slops, as worn by sailors from the late 16th through to the 18th centuries. This unique set of loose, practical sailor’s clothing reveals life aboard ship. They are made of very strong linen to endure the hard, rough work. There is tar across the front from hauling ropes. The breeches are heavily mended and patched, which the sailor would have done himself. Production Date: 1600-1700

Extremely rare survival of a shirt and breeches, called slops, as worn by sailors from the late through to the centuries.

At the V & A museum - not on display (One of three photos). Note the breeches are gathered, not pleated flat. Wool, lined with linen and trimmed with silk. Once belonged to a distant part of my family.

Doublet and breeches Place of origin: England, Great Britain (made) Date: (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Wool, trimmed with silk and lined with linen Credit Line: Given by Lady Spickernell Museum number:

1530's base layer for servant, silk doublet alternate, by Tudor Tailor

'Principality of Fenswick (Glantri;) base layer for servant, silk doublet alternate, by Tudor Tailor]

Tudor Costume  Slashed trousers and sleeves with the undergarment pulled through....see hip hop

Tudor Tailor - courtier's suit made for JMD at Hampton Court Palace. Based on a painting in the Royal Collection of an unknown man. Suit consists of doublet, hose and gown and bonnet in red silk velvet with red and gold striped 'pullings out'.