Roar Hamre

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Roar Hamre
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my-hindi-alma: “ Theyyam, popular Hindu ritual art form of worship of North Kerala, India.

Ute Chief Piah. Photo by William Henry Jackson. 1877-1878,

Ute Chief Piah. Photo by William Henry Jackson. 1877-1878,

A prixe-winning Travois at Lake Windemere in British Columbia. 1922.

A prixe-winning Travois at Lake Windemere in British Columbia. 1922.

"Col. Wm. F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) and Gordon W. Lillie (Pawnee Bill) and Native American men. 1883.

"Col. Wm. F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) and Gordon W. Lillie (Pawnee Bill) and Native American men. 1883.

"Col. Wm. F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) and Gordon W. Lillie (Pawnee Bill) and Native American men. 1883.

"Col. Wm. F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) and Gordon W. Lillie (Pawnee Bill) and Native American men. 1883.

Comanche mother and child. ca. 1900

Comanche mother and child. ca. 1900

Elderly Pueblo Indian woman carrying a load. 1925. Photo by Frashers. Source - Princeton Digital Library.

Elderly Pueblo Indian woman carrying a load. 1925. Photo by Frashers. Source - Princeton Digital Library.

Bartelda, Chiracahua Apache 1926. Photo by Frank Shoemaker. Source - Palace of the Governors Archives.

Bartelda, Chiracahua Apache 1926. Photo by Frank Shoemaker. Source - Palace of the Governors Archives.

It's believed that Chinggis (Genghis) Khan used the games to cultivate able warriors when he founded the Mongol Empire in 1206. Many of the warriors in his army were women. In the late 13th century, Khutulun, a Mongolian princess warrior and great-great granddaughter of Khan, reigned as the undefeated wrestling champ of the kingdom. "Khutulun was unusual, but not unique," historian Jack Weatherford writes in his essay The Wrestler Princess. "#Mongol women rode horses as skillfully as men…

It's believed that Chinggis (Genghis) Khan used the games to cultivate able warriors when he founded the Mongol Empire in 1206. Many of the warriors in his army were women. In the late 13th century, Khutulun, a Mongolian princess warrior and great-great granddaughter of Khan, reigned as the undefeated wrestling champ of the kingdom. "Khutulun was unusual, but not unique," historian Jack Weatherford writes in his essay The Wrestler Princess. "#Mongol women rode horses as skillfully as men…

It's believed that Chinggis (Genghis) Khan used the games to cultivate able warriors when he founded the Mongol Empire in 1206. Many of the warriors in his army were women. In the late 13th century, Khutulun, a Mongolian princess warrior and great-great granddaughter of Khan, reigned as the undefeated wrestling champ of the kingdom. "Khutulun was unusual, but not unique," historian Jack Weatherford writes in his essay The Wrestler Princess. "#Mongol women rode horses as skillfully as men…

It's believed that Chinggis (Genghis) Khan used the games to cultivate able warriors when he founded the Mongol Empire in 1206. Many of the warriors in his army were women. In the late 13th century, Khutulun, a Mongolian princess warrior and great-great granddaughter of Khan, reigned as the undefeated wrestling champ of the kingdom. "Khutulun was unusual, but not unique," historian Jack Weatherford writes in his essay The Wrestler Princess. "#Mongol women rode horses as skillfully as men…

War chiefs Little Plume (left) and Little Dog (right). Blackfeet. Montana. Early 1900s. Glass lantern slide by Walter McClintock. Source - Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

War chiefs Little Plume (left) and Little Dog (right). Blackfeet. Montana. Early 1900s. Glass lantern slide by Walter McClintock. Source - Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library