Explore Native American Men, American Indians, and more!

Paul Showay Cayuse  A Native American man standing outside against a black fabric backdrop hung from the side of a building. He is wearing a horned and feathered headdress, a buckskin shirt, geometrically-beaded moccasins, a necklace, and a blanket wrapped around his legs. He is holding an unidentified object in his left hand with hair or fur on the end of it.  Photo by Major Lee Moorhouse

Paul Showay Cayuse A Native American man standing outside against a black fabric backdrop hung from the side of a building. He is wearing a horned and feathered headdress, a buckskin shirt, geometrically-beaded moccasins, a necklace, and a blanket wrapped around his legs. He is holding an unidentified object in his left hand with hair or fur on the end of it. Photo by Major Lee Moorhouse

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Chiricahua Apache Princess - Portrait of an Indian maiden holding a finely-crafted, coiled basket. Like Indian men, women would also wear leggings above their moccasins. Studio Portrait by A.

Jennie Peo - Cayuse - 1900

David Young - Cayuse - 1900 Billy O-We-U - Cayuse - 1900 unidentified man, Billy O-We-U - Cayuse - 1900 Cayuse men - 1900 Cayuse men - 1900 Anthony, Catherine - Cayuse - 1900 Mrs.

Ida How-Lish-Te-Moew-Na - Cayuse - 1900.  Photo by Major Lee Moorhouse

David Young - Cayuse - 1900 Billy O-We-U - Cayuse - 1900 unidentified man, Billy O-We-U - Cayuse - 1900 Cayuse men - 1900 Cayuse men - 1900 Anthony, Catherine - Cayuse - 1900 Mrs.

Paul Showeway - Cayuse man

Paul Showeway - Cayuse man

Big Hand, a (Sioux Arikara) medicine man. The medicine men among the Indians were usually those men who thought more deeply than the average men in the tribe. They were seen as wise men. Medicine men or spiritual leaders were in a different class than other men of their tribe. This special status was not dependent on their hunting. Contact with other tribes enabled thinkers to build and expand their belief frameworks, so they were more prevalent in tribes that were accessible to outsiders.

Big Hand, a (Sioux Arikara) medicine man. The medicine men among the Indians were usually those men who thought more deeply than the average men in the tribe. They were seen as wise men. Medicine men or spiritual leaders were in a different class than oth

Pawnee Brave

Pawnee Brave with hatchet, wearing bone necklace and other traditional clothing. Okmulgee, Indian Territory c.

Black Elk was involved in several battles with the U.S. cavalry. He participated, at about the age of twelve, in the Battle of Little Big Horn of 1876, and was injured in the Wounded Knee Massacre. He became a Medicine Man of the Oglala Sioux. He taught the first peace was to realize that we are one with all creation and to realize that at the center of all creation was the Great Spirit and that it is everywhere and within us.

Quotes From Black Elk

Nicholas Black Elk [Hehaka Sapa] (c. December 1863 – 17 August or 19 August was a famous Wichasha Wakan (Medicine Man or Holy Man) and Heyoka of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux). He participated at about the age of twelve in the Battle of Little Big H

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