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Paul Showay Cayuse  A Native American man standing outside against a black fabric backdrop hung from the side of a building. He is wearing a horned and feathered headdress, a buckskin shirt, geometrically-beaded moccasins, a necklace, and a blanket wrapped around his legs. He is holding an unidentified object in his left hand with hair or fur on the end of it.  Photo by Major Lee Moorhouse

Paul Showay Cayuse A Native American man standing outside against a black fabric backdrop hung from the side of a building. He is wearing a horned and feathered headdress, a buckskin shirt, geometrically-beaded moccasins, a necklace, and a blanket wrapped around his legs. He is holding an unidentified object in his left hand with hair or fur on the end of it. Photo by Major Lee Moorhouse

Brig. Gen. E.S. Godfrey (7th Cavalry, survivor of the Battle of Little Bighorn) at the 50th Anniversary of this battle, standing next to a Sioux Warrior in traditional dress, both in front of a newly placed engraved cross... (On the same photo, this Indian was also identified as White Man Runs Him, Custer's Crow scout !?!) - Photographer unidentified. - 1926 - (B/W copy)

Brig. Gen. E.S. Godfrey (7th Cavalry, survivor of the Battle of Little Bighorn) at the 50th Anniversary of this battle, standing next to a Sioux Warrior in traditional dress, both in front of a newly placed engraved cross... (On the same photo, this Indian was also identified as White Man Runs Him, Custer's Crow scout !?!) - Photographer unidentified. - 1926 - (B/W copy)

Big Hand, a (Sioux Arikara) medicine man. The medicine men among the Indians were usually those men who thought more deeply than the average men in the tribe. They were seen as wise men. Medicine men or spiritual leaders were in a different class than other men of their tribe. This special status was not dependent on their hunting. Contact with other tribes enabled thinkers to build and expand their belief frameworks, so they were more prevalent in tribes that were accessible to outsiders.

Big Hand, a (Sioux Arikara) medicine man. The medicine men among the Indians were usually those men who thought more deeply than the average men in the tribe. They were seen as wise men. Medicine men or spiritual leaders were in a different class than other men of their tribe. This special status was not dependent on their hunting. Contact with other tribes enabled thinkers to build and expand their belief frameworks, so they were more prevalent in tribes that were accessible to outsiders.

Crow native American, Son of the Star with an unidentified man and child. Son of the Star, is seated wearing a fur hat. Photographed by D. F. Barry. Date 188-?

Crow native American, Son of the Star with an unidentified man and child. Son of the Star, is seated wearing a fur hat. Photographed by D. F. Barry. Date 188-?

Sunflower, Native American, indian, culture, beautiful, portrait, posing, portrait, vintage, picture, photo b/w.

Sunflower, Native American, indian, culture, beautiful, portrait, posing, portrait, vintage, picture, photo b/w.

Black Horse. Arapaho

Black Horse. Arapaho

Name: Black Coyote Claw Necklace   - Arapaho 1891

Name: Black Coyote Claw Necklace - Arapaho 1891

Black Otter - Southern Arapaho - 1898

Black Otter - Southern Arapaho - 1898

An unidentified girl of the Mandan Tribe. No date or additional information.

An unidentified girl of the Mandan Tribe. No date or additional information.

Eneas Paul Koostatah, a Kootenai Indian, poses on his horse at Logan

Eneas Paul Koostatah, a Kootenai Indian, poses on his horse at Logan

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