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Chief Little Head - Crow - Photographer: Frank Jay Haynes, 1883. (B&W copy)

Chief Little Head - Crow - Photographer: Frank Jay Haynes, 1883. (B&W copy)

Hopi Chief. 1903. Photo by Edward S. Curtis

Hopi Chief. 1903. Photo by Edward S. Curtis

Chief Big Foot 1825–1890, with his wife White Hawk. Photo taken 1872. Big Foot was born in the northern Great Plains. One of the first Sioux to raise a corn crop on the Cheyenne River. He traveled to Washington, D.C., as a tribal delegate and worked to establish schools throughout the Sioux territory. Tragically killed.

Chief Big Foot 1825–1890, with his wife White Hawk. Photo taken 1872. Big Foot was born in the northern Great Plains. One of the first Sioux to raise a corn crop on the Cheyenne River. He traveled to Washington, D.C., as a tribal delegate and worked to establish schools throughout the Sioux territory. Tragically killed.

Cooperation...the wisdom of Sitting Bull.,  http://www.pinterest.com/pin/64105994669429851/

Cooperation...the wisdom of Sitting Bull., http://www.pinterest.com/pin/64105994669429851/

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Joe Medicine Crow (b. 1913) as a young man; WW2 veteran and the only living Crow war chief according to the four traditional tasks to achieve this rank. Grandson of Medicine Crow, graduate of Linfield College with master's in anthropology from USC. Historian and author.  (See Ken Burns' documentary The War, episode 5 FUBAR)

Joe Medicine Crow (b. 1913) as a young man; WW2 veteran and the only living Crow war chief according to the four traditional tasks to achieve this rank. Grandson of Medicine Crow, graduate of Linfield College with master's in anthropology from USC. Historian and author. (See Ken Burns' documentary The War, episode 5 FUBAR)

Taken between 1875 and 1880 by Charles Savage, evidence suggests that this image may be of Northwestern Shoshone chief Sagwitch (1822-1887) and his last wife, Beawoachee.  Sagwitch was a survivor of the 1863 Bear River Massacre near Preston, Idaho.  Three of his sons also survived, including a two-year-old shot seven times.

Taken between 1875 and 1880 by Charles Savage, evidence suggests that this image may be of Northwestern Shoshone chief Sagwitch (1822-1887) and his last wife, Beawoachee. Sagwitch was a survivor of the 1863 Bear River Massacre near Preston, Idaho. Three of his sons also survived, including a two-year-old shot seven times.

Here we present a rare image of Stinking Bear. It was taken in 1905 by Edward S. Curtis.

Here we present a rare image of Stinking Bear. It was taken in 1905 by Edward S. Curtis.

Wiwanyag Wachipi - Cerca con Google

Wiwanyag Wachipi - Cerca con Google

anthony luke's not-just-another-photoblog Blog: Fascinating 19th Century Portraits of Native American Indians ~ By Photographer Frank A. Rinehart

anthony luke's not-just-another-photoblog Blog: Fascinating 19th Century Portraits of Native American Indians ~ By Photographer Frank A. Rinehart

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