Memorial: Paper lanterns float down the Motoyasu River in Hiroshima to mark the 66th anniversary of the bombing

Lanterns for 140,000 'spirits': Hiroshima marks anniversary of A-bomb as Japanese PM admits he 'regrets' nuclear power

Papierlaternen schwimmen auf dem Fluss Motoyasu in Hiroshima, dem Jahrestag der Bombardierung durch Atombomben. Memorial: Paper lanterns float down the Motoyasu River in Hiroshima to mark the anniversary of the bombing

Hiroshima Lantern Festival, Japan

Memorial: Paper lanterns float down the Motoyasu River in Hiroshima to mark the anniversary of the bombing

Memorial lanterns on the Motoyasu River

Hiroshima Lantern floating Ikenogami Ikenogami Tanaka Memorial Park in Japan

Toro Nagashi  (灯籠流し)  is a Japanese ceremony in which participants float paper lanterns (chōchin) down a river; tōrō is traditionally another word for lantern, while nagashi means “cruise, flow”.

Toro Nagashi (灯籠流し) is a Japanese ceremony in which participants float paper lanterns (chōchin) down a river; tōrō is traditionally another word for lantern, while nagashi means “cruise, flow”. THIS IS WHY THE JAPANESE CULTURE IS THE BEST.

FOTOS: Hiroshima y el mundo recuerdan los 68 años de la bomba atómica

Paper lanterns float along the Motoyasu River that runs by the Atomic Bomb Dome…

Hiroshima Peace Memorial

Hiroshima Peace Memorial: I exploded in the sky this: Bomb Dome.

Lantern Festival, Sakura, Japan

Sakura Lanterns, with Japanese kanji characters. Sakura (櫻花) means cherry tree in Japan, and this style of lantern is associated with the annual cherry blossom festival (hanami, 花見, lit.

Miyako Ishiuchi photographs clothes and objects preserved from the Hiroshima.

Chromogenic Print of An Atom-Bombed Dress by Ishiuchi Miyako Miyako photographed clothing and accessories left behind by victims of the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima

Floating lanterns, Hiroshima, Japan

Paper lanterns floating on the Motoyasu River at the Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, Japan. The event marks the anniversary of the atomic bombing by the United States in In Japan, people float lanterns on the waters to send off spirits of the dead.

Toro Nagashi is a Japanese local event in which participants float toro or chochin (paper lanterns), and offerings down a river. This is primarily done during the obon season based on the belief that this guides the spirits of the departed,

Photo: Hiroshima, Japan: Paper lanterns float in the Motoyasu river in front of the Atomic Bomb Dome on the anniversary of the nuclear strike

Loy Kratong Floating Lantern in Chiang Mai, Thailand

Monks at the Loy Krathong Floating Lantern Festival in Chiang Mai, Thailand. The festival is held every year on the full moon of the twelfth month in the Thai Lunar Calendar.

Hiroshima 8/6/45. For Matsushige himself, his films were so toxic that he was unable to develop them for twenty days, and even then had to do so at night and in the open, rinsing it in a stream. When he tried to publish them, they were confiscated. Under the blanket rule that “nothing shall be printed which might, directly or by inference, disturb public tranquility,” graphic photos from Hiroshima and Nagasaki were not printed until the U.S. occupation ended in Japan in April 1952.

Hiroshima, 6th August 1945

Yoshito Matsushige, Dazed survivors huddle together in the street ten minutes after the atomic bomb was dropped on their city, Hiroshima, August 1945

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