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Present day view across the Loos battlefield of 1915.

Remembrance Images on

Present day view across the Loos battlefield of

Armistice Clearing, Compeigne. #WWICentenary.

Remembrance Images on

Armistice Clearing, Compeigne. #WWICentenary.

Written in the trenches. During WW1, many battles were fought in the trenches. This was called trench warfare.

Trench warfare caused war of attrition because the armies were so close to each other their goal was to overpower the enemy by making them weak.

anjos-de-mons.2

Anjos de Mons ou Extraterrestres de Mons?

The Angels of Mons - Was this a miraculous event or was it a figment of thousands of soldiers deranged minds. Decide yourself.

Graves of members of the 26th Battalion, New Zealand Expeditionary Force, Cassino, Italy

Graves of members of the Battalion, New Zealand Expeditionary Force, Cassino, Italy

WWI. German gas attack seen from the air, The Illustrated London News, 15 December 1918.

The Illustrated London News December 1915 showing an aerial gas attack in World War I.

General Herbert Plumer, military medal.

Lady Ambulance Drivers decorated for bravery during air-raids

A man looks at the names of the dead at The National Memorial Arboretum near Lichfield, Staffordshire

Overcome with grief - Names of the fallen: A man looks upon names of the dead before a candle-lit vigil at the National Memorial Arboretum in Stafford, UK - Ten million soldiers died in the First World War, and more than double that number were injured.

The Most Powerful Images Of World War I

The Most Powerful Images Of World War I

WWI: Massed German prisoners of war at a clearing station after the successful Allied offensive near Amiens in Northern France, which began on the August General Ludendorff described it as ‘The Black Day of the German Army’

Trench warfare in WW1.

Officers and men of the Inf., in the front line, Ansauville sector, 20 Jan

Notre Dame de Lorette Memorial.

Remembrance Images on

Notre Dame de Lorette Memorial.

A huge bomb crater at Messines Ridge in Northern France, photographed soon after the end of World War One, circa March 1919. This image is from a series documenting the damage and devastation that was caused to towns and villages along the Western Front in France and Belgium during the First World War.

Shaping nature: A huge bomb crater at Messines Ridge in Northern France, photographed circa March soon after the end of World War I.

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