Explore Herefordshire, Church Architecture, and more!

"If any church deserves the word “extraordinary” it is Kilpeck, Herefordshire. Once adjacent to a Benedictine monastery, it dates from about 1140AD and is little changed since. Though from comparatively late in the Norman period, it is awash with the most elaborate carvings, many of a distinctly un-christian nature. Celtic, Scandinavian, Anglo-Saxon and pagan imagery vies with Christian iconography in a riot of dragons, warriors, monsters and animals." Simon Jenkins

Stunning century Kilpeck Church in England - remarkable example of Norman church architecture.

This is the beautiful church of St Mary in the Marsh in Kent. It is built on the site of an earlier Saxon church and dates from 1133. In the foreground is the modest grave of Edith Nesbit, author of many books including the famous children's book The Railway Children. Photograph by B Lowe

This is the beautiful church of St Mary in the Marsh in Kent. It is built on the site of an earlier Saxon church and dates from

Weobley Church in the medieval village of Weobley, Herefordshire, UK Herefordshire is a beautiful county full of villages like this.

England Travel Inspiration - Weobley Church in the medieval village of Weobley, Herefordshire, UK Herefordshire is a beautiful county full of villages like this.

The old church by Steffe, via Flickr ~ Sweden

The old church ~ Sweden

Old Cambridge Baptist Church in Harvard Square - home to Jose Mateo Ballet Theatre Company, Cambridge, MA | by CambridgeRealEstate.com

Old Cambridge Baptist Church in Harvard Square - home to Jose Mateo Ballet Theatre Company, Cambridge, MA | by CambridgeRealEstate.com

Escomb Saxon Church, County Durham, UK A little  gem of a Saxon church. Its masonry, much of it Roman, is dark and gloomy, blackened and ingrained with soot from the factory chimneys that once darkened the landscape here. One of only a few original and untouched Saxon churches, it was built sometime before 675.

St John's at Escomb, County Durham, England, is one of the most complete Anglo-Saxon Churches in England, founded in Most of the stone came from the nearby Roman Fort at Binchester

Glasnevin Cemetary, final resting place to over 1.1 million, North Dublin, Ireland Copyright: Noel Byrne

Glasnevin Cemetary, final resting place to over million, North Dublin, Ireland Copyright: Noel Byrne

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