Explore Science Photos, Science Gallery, and more!

Chicken embryo vascular system - This fluorescence micrograph shows the vascular system of a developing chicken embryo. At this stage of development, the embryo and its surrounding vasculature are a little smaller than a 5p coin. Credit: Vincent Pasque, University of Cambridge

LOOK: Award-Winning Microscopic Images

This fluorescence micrograph shows the vascular system of a developing chicken embryo, two days after fertilization. Injecting fluorescent dextran revealed the entire vasculature used by the embryo to feed itself from the rich yolk inside the egg.

Eye of a Damselfly  Image by Igor Siwanowicz, Max Planck Institute for Neurobiology, Munich, Germany.

Eye of a Damselfly Image by Igor Siwanowicz, Max Planck Institute for Neurobiology, Munich, Germany.

Фотографии микроскопических водорослей

Colourised scanning electron microscope image of diatoms by Dr Paul Hargreaves and Faye Darling

vida microscopica ciencia y arte - Buscar con Google Así fotografiaban la estructura de los copos de nieve en 1885

coccolithophorid marine organism Courtesy of Philippe Crassous Image Details Instrument used: Quanta Family Magnification: 14269 Horizontal Field Width: micron Vacuum: mbar Voltage: 10 Spot: Working Distance: 10 mm Detector: SE

Widefield image of a pilidium larvae of the Nemertean ribbon worm, Cerebratulus lacteus, stained for F-actin (green; phalloidin), Acetylated tubulin (red) and DAPI (blue; nuclei)

Widefield image of a pilidium larvae of the Nemertean ribbon worm, Cerebratulus lacteus, stained for F-actin (green; phalloidin), Acetylated tubulin (red) and DAPI (blue;

Bioluminescent Dinoflagellates - single celled protozoa

SCHIZOGENY - asexual reproduction by multiple fission, found in some protozoa, especially parasitic sporozoans. (Pictured are Bioluminescent Dinoflagellates - single celled protozoa)

This false-colored scanning electron micrograph shows caffeine crystals. Caffeine is a bitter, crystalline xanthine alkaloid that acts as a stimulant drug. In plants, caffeine functions as a defense mechanism. Found in varying quantities in the seeds, leaves and fruit of some plants, caffeine acts as a natural pesticide that paralyzes and kills certain insects feeding on the plant.

Caffeine photo: Eww, what’s that in your coffee?

Caffeine crystals by Annie Cavanagh and David McCarthy. This false-coloured scanning electron micrograph shows caffeine crystals. Caffeine is a bitter, crystalline xanthine alkaloid that acts as a stimulant drug.

Sinewy filaments within squirming microscopic diatoms, a type of algae, are artificially rainbow hued as a result of being photographed through polarizing light filters. Captured by retired British microscopist Michael Stringer

Diatom Rainbows Sinewy filaments within squirming microscopic diatoms, a type of algae, are artificially rainbow hued as a result of being photographed through polarizing light filters. —Photograph by Michael Stringer/photo courtesy of Nikon Small World

Zebrafish embryo

SpaceX Video Lets You Relive Falcon 9 Rocket Landing

A zebrafish embryo is shown 22 hours after fertilization. (Philipp Keller, Bill Lemon, Yinan Wan and Kristin Branson, Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute) 11 amazing images from high-powered microscopes - The Washington Post

A Drosophila melanogaster embryo using in situ hybridization to visualize mRNA expression of the gap gene giant (red) and the pair-rule gene even-skipped (blue), with Sytox Green (Invitrogen) used to localize nuclei. Specimen preparation and imaging by Cecelia Miles, Dr. Martin Kreitman's lab; projection and cover design by Dr. Vytas Bindokas; University of Chicago, USA.

A Drosophila melanogaster embryo using in situ hybridization to visualize mRNA expression of the gap gene giant (red) and the pair-rule gene even-skipped (blue), with Sytox Green (Invitrogen) used to localize nuclei.

Meet Promachoteuthis sulcus, a bizarre creature straight out of your nightmares.  As you can see, this thing has freakishly human looking teeth. It’s a species of promachoteuthid squid and only one specimen has been found to date. It was captured in the Southern Atlantic Ocean at a depth of 2,000m in 2007.

Promachoteuthis sulcus, a bizarre creature. As you can see, this thing has human looking teeth. It’s a species of promachoteuthid squid and only one specimen has been found to date. It was captured in the Southern Atlantic Ocean at a depth of

Tortula papillosa (moss)

This photograph of Tortula papillosa moss magnified 20 times was awarded an Image of Distinction. It was taken by Christian Gautier of the Biosphoto Agency in Le Mans, France.

Wow. Science meets art again. This wonderfully talented gal, Michelle Leung, has captured the development of a chicken embryo. Gorgeous.

Science meets art again. This wonderfully talented gal, Michelle Leung, has captured the development of a chicken embryo.

"A scanning electron microscope image of spider silk glands making a thread c/o Dennis Kunkel Microscopy."

A scanning electron microscope image of spider silk glands making a thread originally from Dennis Kunkel Microscopy. the colours looks very interesting under a microscope

Pinterest
Search