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Africa | Bracelets worn by the Arsi peoples of Ethiopia | Ivory | Each of these bracelets is made up of multiple disks tied together with leather straps.  Often the outer ivory disks would have patterns made up of dots or lines.

Arsi ivory bracelets, Ethiopia, made of multiple ivory disks bound with leather straps.

Africa | Elephant Ivory bracelet from the early 1900s.  Traditionally worn by the Gurunsi people in Burkina Faso and the Kasena women in Ghana. |  Sign of wealth and protects from negative influences

This bracelet is made by an elephant tusk ,it’s worn by women from the Gurunsi population in Burkina Faso, and the Kasena women in Ghana that wear this piece as a sign of wealth and protection against negative influences.

Africa |  Ivory bracelet from the Democratic Republic of Congo. | Age, prior to 1938.

Ivory, height: in. diameter: 6 in. Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn Museum Collection, Creative Commons-BY

Africa | Bracelets from the Wolof people. Mali or Senegal | Bronze | ca. 1964 || American Museum of Natural History Collection

Africa | Bracelets from the Wolof people. Mali or Senegal | Bronze | ca. 1964 || American Museum of Natural History Collection

Africa |  Antique etched engraved Ivory Bracelet. | 19th century.  |  Likely to have come from West Africa

Africa - antique etched engraved ivory bracelet - century - likely to have come from West Africa.

Africa | Bracelet from the Tuareg people of Niger.  Silver | 20th century

century Geography: Niger Culture: Tuareg peoples Medium: Silver Dimensions: Height in.

Africa |  Collection of West African bracelets and anklets | From the collection of Andre Balandin

Collection of West African bracelets and anklets, from the collection of Andre Balandin

Africa | Anklet "ogba" from the Igbo people of Nigeria | Brass || Up to the 1920s it was in fashion for Igbo-girls and -women of higher ranks, to wear such "ogba" around their ankles. This definitely caused a clumsy way of going, which nevertheless became a status symbol by itself, even imitated at a time these anklets were no longer in use. | 300€ ~ Sold

Africa | Anklet "ogba" from the Igbo people of Nigeria | Brass || Up to the 1920s it was in fashion for Igbo-girls and -women of higher ranks, to wear such "ogba" around their ankles. This definitely caused a clumsy way of going, which nevertheless became a status symbol by itself, even imitated at a time these anklets were no longer in use. | 300€ ~ Sold

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