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Jillian Tamaki’s illustrations for Irish Myths and Legends by Lady Augusta Gregory.

inle-hain: Jillian Tamaki’s illustrations for... - ferretbaby86

Lady Gregory’s tales in a lavish slip-case edition of Irish Myths and Legends (public library) featuring stunning art by Brooklyn-based illustrator and cartoonist Jillian Tamaki. Stunning Illustrations for Irish Myths and Legends

A Gancanagh (from Irish: Gean Cánach meaning "love talker") is a male faerie in Irish mythology that is known for seducing human women. The Gancanagh are thought to have an addictive toxin in their skin that make the humans they seduce literally addicted to them. The women seduced by this type of faerie typically die from the withdrawal, pining away for the Ganacanagh's love or fighting to the death for his love.

Six Celtic Mythological Creatures you may not know

A Gancanagh (from Irish: Gean Cánach meaning "love talker") is a male faerie in Irish mythology that is known for seducing human women.

Wiki, a great place to find out names to research more names.

Bunworth Banshee, Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland by Thomas Crofton Croker, 1825

the dobhar-chu

Hey You, Dobhar-chu

In Irish folklore, the Dobhar-chu is a water creature that resembles an otter or a dog, and may be part fish. It is also a cryptid, and there are alleged sighting of the Dobar-chu as recently as Possible Puck sightings, while in the Northern Kingdom?

Irish Myths: Deep Cuts Jillian Tamaki

Jillian Tamaki is an artist originally from Calgary. She now works as an illustrator, cartoonist and teacher in New York City. Jillian generously shares her working process and ideas about … Continued

'He saw by the moonlight momentarily unveiled, a little island encircled by the flood; and there under the branches of the overhanging trees was Undine' - by de la Motte Fouqué, 1909

'He saw by the moonlight momentarily unveiled, a little island encircled by the flood; and there under the branches of the overhanging trees was Undine' - by de la Motte Fouqué, 1909

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