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Since its invention, photography has provided a window into the events that have changed the course of our nation. Here are the images that have shocked, inspired, and moved us as a country.

The 50 Most Powerful Pictures In American History

Teenager Juan Romero sits by Robert F. Kennedy’s side moments after Kennedy was shot. Romero had been shaking his hand when the presidential contender was shot by Sirhan Sirhan.

Robert-F.-Kennedys-Martin-Luther-King-Jr.-Assassination-Speech.jpg (564×803)

Two influential leaders who were sadly taken too soon for speaking truths many were afraid to hear. (Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr.) And he who speaks no truth, lives.

PoW Horace Greasley defiantly confronts Heinrich Himmler during an inspection of the camp he was confined in. Greasley also famously escaped from the camp and snuck back in more than 200 times to meet in secret with a local German girl he had fallen in love with. 40 Of The Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken

The Defiance: Himmler and a prisoner locked in a staring contest, 1941 : OldSchoolCool

London, Royalty, Queen Victoria and Four Generations II

it Four Generations of British Sovereigns. Queen Victoria, King Edward VII, King George V, King Edward VIII

Standing as one of the most-heinous, race-motivated crimes in America’s history, the kidnapping & savage lynching of 14-year-old Emmett Till in Mississippi. Considered a transformative moment in the African-American Civil Rights Movement, Till’s death shocked a nation & still resonates deeply. Till’s murder helped push along the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, which allowed the U.S. Department of Justice to investigate in local matters.

Standing as one of the most-heinous, race-motivated crimes in America’s history, the kidnapping & savage lynching of Emmett Till in Mississippi. Considered a transformative moment in the African-American Civil Rights Movement, Till’s death sho

1981, March 30: President Reagan and three others are wounded outside the Washington Hilton Hotel in Washington, D.C., by shots fired by John Hinckley Jr. Reagan's press secretary James Brady suffers permanent brain damage. Hinckley is found not guilty by reason of insanity.

Monday, March just 69 days into the presidency of Ronald Reagan. While leaving a speaking engagement at the Washington Hilton Hotel in Washington, D., President Reagan and three others were shot and wounded by John Hinckley, Jr.

9/11 2001

This image, made by Bergen Record photographer Thomas E. Franklin on the day of the attacks, eerily calls to mind one of American historys most iconic pictures: Joe Rosenthals 1945 photograph of five Marines and a Navy corpsman raising the Stars

1968 - South Vietnam national police chief Nguyen Ngoc Loan executes a suspected Viet Cong member. (Eddie Adams)

February 1968 Eddie Adams, USA, The Associated Press. The police chief sudvietnamita Nguyen Ngoc Loan executing a Viet Cong suspect in Saigon.

Final Days, Camps, Wwii, Germany, Campsis, World War Ii, Deutsch, World War Two

Can We Just Take a Moment to Appreciate the Mugshots from the 20s? It's like a magazine photo shoot.

Police mugshots in the 1920s…

Let's take a minute to appreciate how awesome police mugshots were in the and another moment to appreciate how dapper real gangsters were.

June 6, 1966 — James Meredith and his March Against Fear/Jack Thronell / AP  Civil rights activist James Meredith grimaces in pain as he pulls himself across Highway 51 after being shot in Hernando, Mississippi, on June 6, 1966. Meredith, who defied segregation to enroll at the University of Mississippi in 1962, completed his protest march from Memphis, Tennessee, to Jackson, Mississippi, after receiving treatment for his wounds.

The 50 Most Powerful Pictures In American History

Civil rights activist James Meredith grimaces in pain as he pulls himself across Highway 51 after being shot in Hernando Mississippi on June 6 x

Old snaps you have to see. Part 5

Old snaps you have to see. Part 5

Old snaps you have to see. You could see the soot on the ceiling in the tube from the first coal underground trains. That's why your snot turns black when you're there. All the soot everywhere.

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