Explore English Vocabulary, English Idioms, and more!

Do you have a frog in your throat?  #idiom -         Repinned by Chesapeake College Adult Ed. We offer free classes on the Eastern Shore of MD to help you earn your GED - H.S. Diploma or Learn English (ESL) .   For GED classes contact Danielle Thomas 410-829-6043 dthomas@chesapeke.edu  For ESL classes contact Karen Luceti - 410-443-1163  Kluceti@chesapeake.edu .  www.chesapeake.edu

“Frog in my throat” means “to be unable to speak clearly because your throat feels dry or blocked”. Example: In the interview I got a frog in my throat and had to cough many times before I could answer the questions.

"Hooked" means addicted; to like something so much that you need it every day. Example: I really like Holly, my new girlfriend. After just two dates, I'm hooked!

"Hooked" means addicted; Example: I really like Holly, my new girlfriend. After just two dates, I'm hooked!

Nervous

"Have your heart in your mouth" means "to be very nervous". Example: Mary had her heart in her mouth because it was her first day at school.

Someone who’s going to die or has died

Spanish idiomatic expressions for essays ¡ojo al parche! don´t drop your guard! keep your eyes peeled! ¡que me quiten lo bailado! - This Spanish expression is originally from.

“Cat got your tongue? Are you surprised to see me? What’s the matter, cat got your tongue?

Up a tree: in a difficult situation #English

"Up a tree" means "in a difficult situation". Example: They found the drugs in his suitcase, so he was up a tree.

Easily annoyed

“Crabby” means easily ​annoyed and ​complaining, ill-tempered. Example: I said hello to Ann and she told me to leave her alone! She’s always so crabby on Monday mornings.

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