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Basket making, Mrs Francis Willmott at basket making  centre under the auspices of the West Sussex Federation of Women’s Institutes. Aim is to produce 2 million potato baskets – countrywide -for years crop. 1943.

070314 willow ~ Basket making, Mrs Francis Willmott at basket making centre under the auspices of the West Sussex Federation of Women’s Institutes. Aim is to produce 2 million potato baskets – countrywide -for years crop.

Above Workers at Moon’s basket manufactury, Long Rock, Penzance, Cornwall. c.1910. Image: Courtesy of Richard Moon basketmaker. His grandfather and father are first and third from left. Crates for transporting cauliflowers to London were made in white willow. The owner’s initials were stencilled on to ensure their return. Crates for harvesting in the field were made in buff willow.

WORKERS AT MOON'S BASKET MANUFACTORY Long Rock, Penzance, Cornwall. Image: from Richard Moon, basket-maker. 'His grandfather and father are first and third from left. Crates for transporting cauliflowers to London were made in white willow. The ow

A Maiko wearing a Susohiki kimono

If you always curious about Japanese culture, you need to look at Kimono facts. Kimono is considered as the traditional clothes for the Japanese people. When you go to Japan, you need to try it.

Be prepared to enjoy traditional taiko drumming performances, as well as some innovative music and choreography, when the Japanese drumming ...

Japanese drumming group takes its beat to heart

Be prepared to enjoy traditional taiko drumming performances, as well as some innovative music and choreography, when the Japanese drumming .

Satogiku-dayuu 1910s.  It was customary for a tayuu (Japanese courtesan) to have two kamuro (child attendants) of about the same age and size, with names that matched in concept and sound, taking their cue from the name of their ane-jōro (elder sister courtesan).  Text and image via Blue Ruin 1 on Flickr

Satogiku-dayuu - It was customary for a tayuu (Japanese courtesan) to have two kamuro (child attendants) of about the same age & size, with names that matched in concept & sound, taking their cue from the name of their ane-jōro (elder sister courtesan).

【タイムスリップ】幕末から明治へ「1800年代末の日本」の臨場感あふれる写真たち

【タイムスリップ】幕末から明治へ「1800年代末の日本」の臨場感あふれる写真たち

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