Freyja and chariot

The Norse goddess Freyja drove a chariot pulled by two gray cats given to her by the god Thor. Find out more about Freyja and five other cat-loving gods and goddesses in my latest Catster post.

Odin’s men went armor-less into battle and were as crazed as dogs or wolves and as strong as bears or bulls. They bit their shields and slew men, while they themselves were harmed by neither fire nor iron.

Odin with a Beserker. Vendel era bronze plate found in Öland, Sweden. To "go berserk" was to "hamask", which translates as "change form", in this case, as with the sense "enter a state of wild fury".

FREYA

Goddess Freyja riding her wagon pulled by her two cats Brundr (rutting male cat) and Kocelinn (cozy, cuddly)

Saemundar Edda og Snorra Edda by Olafur Brynjulfsson

Norse god Odin had a magic goat that filled a pitcher every day with the mead of poetry, the most precious drink in the universe which would turn anyone who drank it into a poet or scholar.

Freya goddess

Photo about Freya Norse goddess of love and beauty riding a chariot pulled by two cats and wild boar walking at her side - 12611734

yes, tack up those damn cats DIOSA FREYA fertility fertilidad - Buscar con Goog

We come from the land of the ice and snow, From the midnight sun where the hot springs flow. The hammer of the gods will drive our ships to new lands, To fight the horde, singing and crying: Valhalla, I am coming!

Freya Aswynn, Leaves of Yggdrasil (Aswynn) Randy P. Conner, Blossom of Bone  (HarperCollins) Kevin Crossley-Holland, The Norse Myths (Penguin)

Norse Vanir Goddess Freyja - goddess of love and war and magic; "Chooser of the Slain" and leader of the Valkyries.

Freyja was Freyr's sister, and was a powerful figure in Norse mythology, worshipped by heroes, kings, and women. Freyja was a fertility goddess  and helped with marriage and child-bearing.

Freyja was Freyr's sister, and was a powerful figure in Norse mythology, worshipped by heroes, kings, and women. Freyja was a fertility goddess and helped with marriage and child-bearing.

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Cupid, Mythology

TANNGRISNIR and TANNGNJOSTR - these were the two goats, Teeth-barer and Teeth grinder, that pulled Thor’s chariot. The flesh of these goats was said to have provided the gods with sustenance so Thor would slay and cook them, then resurrect them with Mjolnir the following day.

Tanngrisnir (Old Norse "teeth-barer, snarler") and Tanngnjóstr (Old Norse "teeth grinder") are the goats that pull the god Thor's chariot

Happy Friday!!!! (Glædelig Fredag!!!!) Freyja Art Print by lindowyn on Etsy, $20.00

Freya’s name appears in numerous place names in Scandinavia, with a high concentration in southern Sweden. Various plants in Scandinavia, One name would be The goddess of beauty! If women wished to be absolutely breathe taking they would prey to freya.

Marc Simont  - From Fish Head - written by Jean Fritz, illustrated by Marc Simont (1954)

Fish Head the cat napping after eating those Flying Fish that just jumped into the boat! Marc Simont - From Fish Head - written by Jean Fritz, illustrated by Marc Simont

The goddess Freya, in the woods

“ Folkvangr In Norse mythology, Fólkvangr (“field of the host” or “people-field” or “army-field”) is a meadow or field ruled over by the goddess Freyja where half of those that die in combat go upon.

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