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Army and RAF personnel refuelling and a Spitfire Mk V, Malta, 17 June 1942.

Army and RAF personnel refuelling and a Spitfire Mk V, Malta, 17 June 1942.

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Beaufighter Mk VIF aircraft of No. 272 Squadron RAF at Luqa airfield, Malta, 27 Jun 1943 (Imperial War Museum)

[Photo] Beaufighter Mk VIF aircraft of No. 272 Squadron RAF Coastal Command at Takali airfield, Malta, 27 Jun 1943

Beaufighter Mk VIF aircraft of No. 272 Squadron RAF at Luqa airfield, Malta, 27 Jun 1943 (Imperial War Museum)

Resting in blast-wall protected Dispersal Point 125 at Luqa, a Bristol Beaufort Mark II of No 39 Squadron, Royal Air Force is attended to by ground crew. Malta June 1943

Resting in blast-wall protected Dispersal Point 125 at Luqa, a Bristol Beaufort Mark II of No 39 Squadron, Royal Air Force is attended to by ground crew. Malta June 1943

Major James Goodson (1921-May 1, 2014) destroyed 30 enemy aircraft, the third most for any American pilot. He survived the September 3, 1939 sinking of the unarmed British passenger ship SS Athenia, and he flew fighters as a member of an RAF Eagle Squadron made up of American volunteers before the U.S. entered the war. He later joined the U.S. Army Air Force. In June 1944, he was shot down and captured but escaped and made his way back to Allied lines. Note both his RAF and U.S. wings.

Major James Goodson (1921-May 1, 2014) destroyed 30 enemy aircraft, the third most for any American pilot. He survived the September 3, 1939 sinking of the unarmed British passenger ship SS Athenia, and he flew fighters as a member of an RAF Eagle Squadron made up of American volunteers before the U.S. entered the war. He later joined the U.S. Army Air Force. In June 1944, he was shot down and captured but escaped and made his way back to Allied lines. Note both his RAF and U.S. wings.

THE BRITISH ARMY ON MALTA 1942. A 3-inch mortar team laying a smoke screen during a demonstration exercise, 13 April 1942. Note helmet camouflage.

THE BRITISH ARMY ON MALTA 1942. A 3-inch mortar team laying a smoke screen during a demonstration exercise, 13 April 1942. Note helmet camouflage.

Flight Lieutenant Denis Barnham of 601 Squadron is pictured with his comrades in the Spitfire which he flew on 14 May 1942, when he intercepted a Ju 88 of 1./Kampfgruppe 806

Stunning images from the RAF battle over Malta in WWII

Flight Lieutenant Denis Barnham of 601 Squadron is pictured with his comrades in the Spitfire which he flew on 14 May 1942, when he intercepted a Ju 88 of 1./Kampfgruppe 806

Ground crews servicing the Martin Baltimore Mark IIIA FA353 “X”, of No. 69 Squadron RAF in a revetment built of limestone blocks at Luqa, Malta. Date unknown but likely 1942 or 1943.

Ground crews servicing the Martin Baltimore Mark IIIA FA353 “X”, of No. 69 Squadron RAF in a revetment built of limestone blocks at Luqa, Malta. Date unknown but likely 1942 or 1943.

Ground staff service a Spitfire Mk I of No 610 Squadron RAF at RAF Biggin Hill in September 1940. The turn-around time of rearming and refuelling a Supermarine fighter on the ground was generally 26 minutes, while the Hurricane Mk I was usually finished in 9 minutes from down to up again. As one fitter of No 145 Squadron RAF quipped, "If we had nothing but Spits we would have lost the fight in 1940."

Ground staff service a Spitfire Mk I of No 610 Squadron RAF at RAF Biggin Hill in September 1940. The turn-around time of rearming and refuelling a Supermarine fighter on the ground was generally 26 minutes, while the Hurricane Mk I was usually finished in 9 minutes from down to up again. As one fitter of No 145 Squadron RAF quipped, "If we had nothing but Spits we would have lost the fight in 1940."

Flight Lieutenant Denis Barnham, Spitfire Vc (Trop) BP955, 601 Squadron RAF with Flight Commander Mike 'Pancho' Le Bas. Luqa, Malta. Late April 1942.

Flight Lieutenant Denis Barnham, Spitfire Vc (Trop) BP955, 601 Squadron RAF with Flight Commander Mike 'Pancho' Le Bas. Luqa, Malta. Late April 1942.

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