Cancel
More information
Army and RAF personnel refuelling and a Spitfire Mk V, Malta, 17 June 1942.
Find this Pin and more on Spitfire by trondstaff.
What others are saying

JUN 17 1942 The strain of constant battle readiness on Malta 1942 - spitfire re-fuelling

Army and RAF personnel refuelling and a Spitfire Mk V, Malta, 17 June 1942.

Army and RAF personnel refuelling and a Spitfire Mk V, Malta, 17 June 1942.

Discover ideas about Ww2 Aircraft

Army and RAF personnel refuelling a Spitfire Mk V, Malta, 17 June

Similar ideas

Cancel
More information
British RAF Spitfire Pilots during the Battle of Britain
What others are saying

British RAF Spitfire Pilots during the Battle of Britain

British RAF Spitfire Pilots during the Battle of Britain
Cancel
More information
JUL 27 1942 Canadian Spitfire Ace scores four over Malta Ground crew refuelling a Supermarine Spitfire Mark VC(T) from a petrol tin at Ta Kali, Malta
JUL 27 1942 Canadian Spitfire Ace scores four over Malta Ground crew refuelling a Supermarine Spitfire Mark VC(T) from a petrol tin at Ta Kali, Malta
Cancel
More information
A RAF’s Spitfire VC forced to land because battle damages on the Scoglitti’s shore, near Ragusa, SE Sicily. The aircraft, of No 185 Squadron RAF based at Malta, was down by the Macchi MC.202 of Italian Air Force’s 51st Stormo, took off from Gela air base, on 9 September 1942.
What others are saying

British Forces - Down over the Sicilian coasts

A RAF’s Spitfire VC forced to land because battle damages on the Scoglitti’s shore, near Ragusa, SE Sicily. The aircraft, of No 185 Squadron RAF based at Malta, was down by the Macchi MC.202 of Italian Air Force’s 51st Stormo, took off from Gela air base, on 9 September 1942.

A RAF’s Spitfire VC forced to land because battle damages on the Scoglitti’s shore, near Ragusa, SE Sicily. The aircraft, of No 185 Squadron RAF based at Malta, was down by the Macchi MC.202 of Italian Air Force’s 51st Stormo, took off from Gela air base, on 9 September 1942.
Cancel
More information
Wing Commander John "Johnny" Milne Checketts, DSO, DFC (20 February 1912 - 21 April 2006) was a New Zealand World War II Flying ace, who destroyed 14½ enemy aircraft, had three probables and damaged 11. He was shot–down twice – once over the English Channel, when he was rescued from the sea by the Royal Navy, and once over occupied France, when he was returned to the United Kingdom by the French Resistance.
Wing Commander John "Johnny" Milne Checketts, DSO, DFC (20 February 1912 - 21 April 2006) was a New Zealand World War II Flying ace, who destroyed 14½ enemy aircraft, had three probables and damaged 11. He was shot–down twice – once over the English Channel, when he was rescued from the sea by the Royal Navy, and once over occupied France, when he was returned to the United Kingdom by the French Resistance.
Cancel
More information
3.7 inch AA gun near Benghisa.
What others are saying

The rare snaps, featured in a new book by Anthony Rogers, give an insight into life on the Mediterranean island during the Siege of Malta between 1940 and

Stunning images from the RAF battle over Malta in WWII

3.7 inch AA gun near Benghisa.

3.7 inch AA gun near Benghisa.

People also love these ideas

Malta, Luqa Airfield, June 1943: the Commander of No 23 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Wing Commander John B Selby, DSO, DFC, already on flight dress, and his observer looking at their de Havilland Mosquito II aircraft “P-Peter” while other members of the Squadron watch from atop the blast wall at the Dispersal Point. The four 20mm cannon are corked to prevent dirt damaging them. Victor Sierra

Malta, Luqa Airfield, June the Commander of No 23 Squadron, Royal Air…

Ground crews servicing the Martin Baltimore Mark IIIA FA353 “X”, of No. 69 Squadron RAF in a revetment built of limestone blocks at Luqa, Malta. Date unknown but likely 1942 or 1943.

Ground crews servicing the Martin Baltimore Mark IIIA “X”, of No. 69 Squadron RAF in a revetment built of limestone blocks at Luqa, Malta. Date unknown but likely 1942 or

Spitfires over Malta - pin by Paolo Big Poop Brains Marzioli

Spitfires over Malta - pin by Paolo Big Poop Brains Marzioli

THE BRITISH ARMY ON MALTA 1942. A 3-inch mortar team laying a smoke screen during a demonstration exercise, 13 April 1942. Note helmet camouflage.

GM A mortar team laying a smoke screen during a demonstration exercise 13 April Note helmet camouflage.

Hurricanes en route to Malta, June 1941.  They were the mainstay of the Mediterranean fighter force till late 1942, Spitfires being retained for home service.  By then they were thoroughly outclassed in air combat, but remained highly effective in the ground attack role.

Hurricanes en route to Malta, June 1941. They were the mainstay of the Mediterranean fighter force till late 1942, Spitfires being retained for home service. By then they were thoroughly outclassed in air combat, but remained highly effective in the ground attack role.

Boys playing on a Stuka wreck on Malta

Maltese children playing amongst the remains of a German dive-bomber December

Hawker Hurricane Mark IIA, Z2961 'K', of the Malta Night Fighter Unit being refuelled and re-armed at Ta Kali, Malta.

Hawker Hurricane Mark IIA, 'K', of the Malta Night Fighter Unit being refuelled and re-armed at Ta Kali, Malta

Luqa, Malta, July 1943: a line of Martin Baltimore Mark IVs of No. 223 Squadron RAF Detachment being refueled and loaded with bombs for a raid on enemy positions around Catania, Sicily

Luqa, Malta, July a line of Martin Baltimore Mark IVs of No. 223 Squadron RAF Detachment being refueled and loaded with bombs for a raid on enemy positions around Catania, Sicily

Malta at war: A packed aircraft carrier arrives under the bombed bastions of the entrance to Valletta's Grand Harbour during the war

Unsinkable Malta ☼ Rare colour photo from Supermarine Seafire L.IIIs of RNAS 808 Squadron on the deck of the escort aircraft carrier HMS Khedive entering the Grand Harbour of Valletta in Malta. July (© Imperial War Museum A

Maltese, Military History, Baltimore, Maryland, Ww2, Aviation, Aircraft, Wings, Airplane

Spitfire in Malta 15 May 1943. Air Vice-Marshall Keith Park about to taxi out in his personal Spitfire V to mark the opening of Malta's new airstrip in Safi.

The Royal Air Force in Malta, May 1943 AOC Malta, Air Vice Marshal Keith Park about to taxi out in his personal Supermarine Spitfire V to m.

ROYAL AIR FORCE  Atrocious weather in the winter of 1944 turned airfields in Belgium and the Netherlands into quagmires. This No 127 Squadron Spitfire XVIE (RR255/9N-Y) has its daily inspection in a sea of mud at Grimbergen (B-60), 9 December.On 29 December this aircraft was shot down by flak and its pilot mortally wounded.

Atrocious weather in the winter of 1944 turned airfields in Belgium and the…

MAY 21 1942 Spitfire vs Messerschmitt 109 over Malta Denis Barnham in Spitfire Flight Lieutenant Dennis Barnham, flight commander of No. 601 Squadron RAF, in the cockpit of his Supermarine Spitfire Mark VB at Luqa, Malta, at a time when his victory tally was five enemy aircraft. Pilot Officer M H Le Bas looks on.

Flight Lieutenant Dennis Barnham, flight commander of No. 601 Squadron RAF, in the cockpit of his Supermarine Spitfire Mark VB at Luqa, Malta, at a time when his victory tally was five enemy aircraft. Pilot Officer M H Le Bas looks on.

Pinterest
Search
Get ideas and inspiration with a free Pinterest account

Unlimited free access to the world's best ideas

Sign up to see more

OR

By continuing, you agree to Pinterest's Terms of Service, Privacy Policy
Already a member?
Log in
Pinterest helps you find ideas to try.