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Elizabeth “Eliza” Pinckney, one of America’s first female inventors was born today, December 28, in 1722. Pinckney perfected Indigo (a seed used as a dye) on her plantation, encouraged others to use it and made it the second largest cash crop in the South.

bs ahp Edward Green Malbone Eliza Izard Mrs Thomas Pinckney Jr « Edward Robert Hughes - search results « Art might - just art

47 Historical Pictures That Will Have You In Awe photography story historical interesting history facts

Sometimes, one simple picture can tell you more about history than any story you might read or any document you might analyze. these pictures are awesome.<< history is fucked up

What's a Southern home without a blue porch ceiling?

I miss those blue porch ceilings! There's a name for the blue of a porch ceiling: Haint Blue. According to Louisiana legend, a “haint” is a spirit or a ghost. The blue paint represents water through which evil spirits cannot pass.

Anne Bradstreet: 1612-1672; Anne Bradstreet was the first poet and first female writer in the British North American colonies to be published. Her first volume of poetry was The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up in America, published in 1650. It was met with a positive reception in both the Old World and the New World.

Anne Bradstreet: was the female writer & poet in the British Colonies to be published.

Marie Tharp (1920-2006) was the first person to map the ocean floor.  Her research showed the the ocean floor was not flat, and many scientists (mostly men) disagreed.  Despite opposition, she continued to work on her map.  Satellite photography has proved the accuracy of her map, which is still in use today.

Marie Tharp was the first person to map the ocean floor. Her research showed the the ocean floor was not flat, and many scientists (mostly men) disagreed. Despite opposition, she continued to work on her map. Satellite photography has prove

Elizabeth Burgin; one of my favorite Revolutionary War spies. A page from her diary is on display in the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.

one of my favorite Revolutionary War spies. A page from her diary is on display in the National Archives Building in Washington, D.

The stairs in the White Tower at the Tower of London where the bones of two boys were found by workmen in 1697 that have long been suspected to be the sons of King Edward IV and his Queen, Elizabeth Woodville.

The haunted stairs in the White Tower (Tower of London) where the bones of two young princes were found and have been long thought to be the sons of Edward IV, murdered by their uncle so he could have the throne.

NO! NONONO! This is ABSOLUTELY UNTRUE. First of all, Victorians would not have known what a modern zombie is. Zombies as we know them today were invented by George Romero. Vampires wouldn't have been feared because they were largely an Eastern European folktale until Dracula was published in 1897 (the very end of the Victorian era). Victorians would have feared grave robbers most of all. These were used to keep HUMANS from getting IN, not the UNDEAD from getting OUT.

This is a grave from the Victorian age when a fear of zombies and vampires was prevalent. The cage was intended to trap the undead just in case the corpse reanimated. --- Wow, We Are A Bunch Of Weird Humans Who Need Prayer ---

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