Image of the “Black Sun”, from Splendor Solis, a German alchemical treatise, 1582 | The Public Domain Review

Image of the “Black Sun”, from Splendor Solis, a German alchemical treatise, 1582 — Source.

These Surreal Ancient Alchemy Manuscripts Are Terrifyingly Cool | Motherboard

These Surreal Ancient Alchemy Manuscripts Are Terrifyingly Cool

These Surreal Ancient Alchemy Manuscripts Are Terrifyingly Cool - Motherboard

These Surreal Ancient Alchemy Manuscripts Are Terrifyingly Cool | Motherboard

These Surreal Ancient Alchemy Manuscripts Are Terrifyingly Cool

Colored etching depicting two peasants holding a red robe while cherubs blow wind and Mercury rests on water below—representing a stage in the process of alchemy (unknown artist, century).

The aim of the hermetic philosophy lies in the uniting of the spiritual with the material. Thus the coat-of-arms of the hermetic art reflects the splendor of the Sun, uniting the planets in the heavens above with the alchemical work in the world of matter below.

Trissmosin's 'Splendor Solis' is a beautiful illuminated alchemical manuscript from the century. A selection of 7 drawings is exclusively available for

Lion and Sun.

One of the classic symbols of alchemy: the green lion devouring the sun, Rosarium Philosophorum, century.

錬金術を超現実的に図解した無料ダウンロード可能な高解像度画像まとめ - GIGAZINE

These Surreal Ancient Alchemy Manuscripts Are Terrifyingly Cool

These Surreal Ancient Alchemy Manuscripts Are Terrifyingly Cool | Motherboard

These Surreal Ancient Alchemy Manuscripts Are Terrifyingly Cool

These Surreal Ancient Alchemy Manuscripts Are Terrifyingly Cool - Behold, the weird and wonderful world of alchemy.

In the the 8th century, in a monastery in the mountains of northern Spain, 700 years after the Book of Revelations was written, a monk named Beatus set down to illustrate a collection of writings he had compiled about this most vivid and apocalyptic of the New Testament books. Throughout the next few centuries his depictions of multi-headed beasts, decapitated sinners, and trumpet blowing angels, would be copied over and over again in various versions of the manuscript. Below is a selection…

From the Beatus of Facundus or Beatus de León. Painted by a man called Facundus for Ferdinand I and Queen Sancha. Illustrates the Commentary on the Apocolypse by Beatus de Liébana.

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