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Frederick I of Sweden

Frederick I of Sweden

King Frederik I of Sweden was given a lion as a gift from the Bey of Algiers in 1731. When it died, a taxidermist was sent the pelt and some of the bones to stuff it. Unfortunately, the taxidermist had never seen a lion before. Hence, The Lion of Gripsholm Castle was born..again.

The Lion of Gripsholm Castle

King Frederik I of Sweden was given a lion as a gift from the Bey of Algiers in 1731. When it died, a taxidermist was sent the pelt and some of the bones to stuff it. Unfortunately, the taxidermist had never seen a lion before. Hence, The Lion of Gripsholm Castle was born..again.

Hedvig Ulrika Taube (1714 – 11 February 1744) also Countess von Hessenstein was a Swedish noble and salonist, official royal mistress to King Frederick I of Sweden. She is generally considered to have been the only official royal mistress in Swedish history, and she did have some political significance.

Hedvig Ulrika Taube (1714 – 11 February 1744) also Countess von Hessenstein was a Swedish noble and salonist, official royal mistress to King Frederick I of Sweden. She is generally considered to have been the only official royal mistress in Swedish history, and she did have some political significance.

Jacket belonging to Frederick Adolph, worn to the coronation of his son, 1772

Jacket belonging to Frederick Adolph, worn to the coronation of his son, 1772

Georg Engelhardt Schröder. Detail from Portrait of Fredrik I, King of Sweden, 18th Century.

Georg Engelhardt Schröder. Detail from Portrait of Fredrik I, King of Sweden, 18th Century.

In 1731, King Frederick I of Sweden gave a lion he had killed to a taxidermist who had never seen a lion before. This was the result. - It's called "The Lion of Gripsholm Castle", but I like to call it "The King of the Bungle".

In 1731, King Frederick I of Sweden gave a lion he had killed to a taxidermist who had never seen a lion before. This was the result.

In 1731, King Frederick I of Sweden gave a lion he had killed to a taxidermist who had never seen a lion before. This was the result. - It's called "The Lion of Gripsholm Castle", but I like to call it "The King of the Bungle".

It's all power in this portrait of Frederick I (1676-1751), King of Sweden, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel wearing cuirass and hermelinbrämad dark blue jacket in interior with regalia. Signed and dated JA Weise, 1737. Frederick I (1676 - 1751) is one of Sweden's most anonymous(!) kings. Brother of Charles XII and husband to Ulrika Eleonora, he conquered the Swedish krona and introduced to the House of Brabant in Sweden. [translated text]. And let's throw in an over-sized lion's head for good…

It's all power in this portrait of Frederick I (1676-1751), King of Sweden, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel wearing cuirass and hermelinbrämad dark blue jacket in interior with regalia. Signed and dated JA Weise, 1737. Frederick I (1676 - 1751) is one of Sweden's most anonymous(!) kings. Brother of Charles XII and husband to Ulrika Eleonora, he conquered the Swedish krona and introduced to the House of Brabant in Sweden. [translated text]. And let's throw in an over-sized lion's head for good…

Story goes that, in 1731, King Frederick I of Sweden received a lion skin as a gift from the Bey of Algiers. The taxidermist tasked with mounting it had never seen a lion in real life, and only had a vague idea of what one was supposed to look like. The resulting monstrosity  remains on display at Gripsholm Castle for all to see.

Story goes that, in 1731, King Frederick I of Sweden received a lion skin as a gift from the Bey of Algiers. The taxidermist tasked with mounting it had never seen a lion in real life, and only had a vague idea of what one was supposed to look like. The resulting monstrosity remains on display at Gripsholm Castle for all to see.

Frederick I of Denmark and Norway, lived 1471–1533, King of Denmark and Norway. Last Roman Catholic monarch to reign over Denmark, when subsequent monarchs embraced Lutheranism after the Reformation. Married 	Anna of Brandenburg, then Sophie of Pomerania. 5x maternal grandfather of Catherine the Creat.

Frederick I of Denmark and Norway, lived 1471–1533, King of Denmark and Norway. Last Roman Catholic monarch to reign over Denmark, when subsequent monarchs embraced Lutheranism after the Reformation. Married Anna of Brandenburg, then Sophie of Pomerania. 5x maternal grandfather of Catherine the Creat.

Frederick I, Swedish: Fredrik I, (28 April 1676 – 5 April 1751) was prince consort of Sweden from 1718 to 1720, and King of Sweden from 1720 until his death and (as Frederick I) also Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel from 1730.

Frederick I, Swedish: Fredrik I, (28 April 1676 – 5 April 1751) was prince consort of Sweden from 1718 to 1720, and King of Sweden from 1720 until his death and (as Frederick I) also Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel from 1730.

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