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LINNES - 03 / Bredde 140 100% Lin

LINNES - 03 / Bredde 140 100% Lin

LINNES - 04 / Bredde 140 100% Lin

LINNES - 04 / Bredde 140 100% Lin

Cave Paintings of Baja California - Archaeology Magazine Archive http://archive.archaeology.org/online/features/baja/

Cave Paintings of Baja California - Archaeology Magazine Archive http://archive.archaeology.org/online/features/baja/

"Norse socks were not knitted, which apparently was unknown to the Norse. Instead, they were made using an ancient technique called nálbinding (needle-binding). Using a single large, thick needle, it was a method of knotting the yarn. Although time consuming, this approach resulted in a nearly indestructible garment. If the thread were to break or wear out, the garment would still be intact, since the thread was everywhere knotted to neighboring threads." This sock found in York.

"Norse socks were not knitted, which apparently was unknown to the Norse. Instead, they were made using an ancient technique called nálbinding (needle-binding). Using a single large, thick needle, it was a method of knotting the yarn. Although time consuming, this approach resulted in a nearly indestructible garment. If the thread were to break or wear out, the garment would still be intact, since the thread was everywhere knotted to neighboring threads." This sock found in York.

How to Make a Replica Viking Chest, Based on the Mastermyr Find

How to Make a Replica Viking Chest, Based on the Mastermyr Find

Round Box Brooch, 700–900  Viking; Made in Gotland, Sweden  Copper alloy. A menagerie of tiny animals inhabits the interlace patterns on this round brooch. The four oval compartments on the top show beasts with round eyes, open jaws, claw feet, and intricately entwined bodies. Known as a box brooch because it was used as a container for small objects, it would have been worn by a Viking woman on the island of Gotland to secure her shawl at the collar.

Round Box Brooch, 700–900 Viking; Made in Gotland, Sweden Copper alloy. A menagerie of tiny animals inhabits the interlace patterns on this round brooch. The four oval compartments on the top show beasts with round eyes, open jaws, claw feet, and intricately entwined bodies. Known as a box brooch because it was used as a container for small objects, it would have been worn by a Viking woman on the island of Gotland to secure her shawl at the collar.

Bilderesultat for brikkebånd oseberg

Bilderesultat for brikkebånd oseberg

Oseberg chest 178

Oseberg chest 178

Yggdrasil "world tree" (In Norse mythology, Yggdrasil (/ˈɪɡdrəsɪl/; from Old Norse Yggdrasill, pronounced [ˈyɡːˌdrasilː]) is an immense tree that is central in Norse cosmology, in connection to which the nine worlds exist.)

Yggdrasil "world tree" (In Norse mythology, Yggdrasil (/ˈɪɡdrəsɪl/; from Old Norse Yggdrasill, pronounced [ˈyɡːˌdrasilː]) is an immense tree that is central in Norse cosmology, in connection to which the nine worlds exist.)

It is a Norse protection symbol called Vegvísir, which has a deep meaning. The Icelandic word literally means ‘guidepost’ or ‘direction sign’. In modern popular culture the Vegvísir is often called Runic Compass or See the Way. It is often associated with the Viking Age, which is not correct: this symbol is from the 17th century Icelandic grimoire called Galdrabók (‘magic book’).

It is a Norse protection symbol called Vegvísir, which has a deep meaning. The Icelandic word literally means ‘guidepost’ or ‘direction sign’. In modern popular culture the Vegvísir is often called Runic Compass or See the Way. It is often associated with the Viking Age, which is not correct: this symbol is from the 17th century Icelandic grimoire called Galdrabók (‘magic book’).

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