Explore De Havilland Mosquito, Photos Of, and more!

1940-50 De Havilland 'DH.98' Mosquito. RAF,RCAF,RAAF, USAAF - Light Bomber, Fighter Bomber, Night Fighter, Maritime strike aircraft, photo-reconnaissance. Engine: 2 x Rolls Royce Merlin 21/21 or 23/23 (left/right), liquid cooled V12 engine (1480 hp 21 & 23, 1103 kW). Armament: 4 x 20 mm (.79 in) Hispano Mk II cannon (fuselage) & 4 x .303 in (.79 mm) Browning machine guns in the nose. Max Speed: 366 mph (318 kn, 589 km/h) @ 21,400 ft (6500 m)

1940-50 De Havilland 'DH.98' Mosquito. RAF,RCAF,RAAF, USAAF - Light Bomber, Fighter Bomber, Night Fighter, Maritime strike aircraft, photo-reconnaissance. Engine: 2 x Rolls Royce Merlin 21/21 or 23/23 (left/right), liquid cooled V12 engine (1480 hp 21 & 23, 1103 kW). Armament: 4 x 20 mm (.79 in) Hispano Mk II cannon (fuselage) & 4 x .303 in (.79 mm) Browning machine guns in the nose. Max Speed: 366 mph (318 kn, 589 km/h) @ 21,400 ft (6500 m)

Malta, Luqa Airfield, June 1943: the Commander of No 23 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Wing Commander John B Selby, DSO, DFC, already on flight dress, and his observer looking at their de Havilland Mosquito II aircraft “P-Peter” while other members of the Squadron watch from atop the blast wall at the Dispersal Point. The four 20mm cannon are corked to prevent dirt damaging them. Victor Sierra

Malta, Luqa Airfield, June the Commander of No 23 Squadron, Royal Air…

Mosquito

Military Aviation Museum‘s (MAM) DeHavilland Mosquito over Virginia Beach (Photo: Luigino Caliaro/Aerophoto)

North American mustang with two bombs and four high velocity aircraft rockets

Ww2 Planes, Ww2 Aircraft, People, Mosquitoes, Brave, Drones, Ideas, Aviation

1 May 1944: Bombing – Berliners ‘prepared to see it through’ Armourers prepare to load 500-lb MC bombs into De Havilland Mosquito B Mark IV, DZ483 ‘GB-R’, of No. 105 Squadron RAF at Marham, Norfolk, in preparation for a night raid on Berlin, Germany by aircraft of No. 2 Group. Two weeks later, DZ483 crashed at Marham while attempting to land on one engine, on returning from the low-level raid on Jena. Its crew, Flying Officer A J Rae and Flying Officer K S Bush, were both killed.

apostlesofmercy: “ An RAF de Havilland Mosquito of 105 squadron is bombed up by ground crew during World War As an aircraft which excelled in speed, with a bomb load equal to that of the.

A Mosquito aircraft actually flying is a rare sight to see these days. There are only two flightworthy de Haviland Mosquito aircraft left today worldwide,

Inside The Cockpit Of One of Only Two Airworthy Mosquitos Left In The World

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