Young Shak-Pay, Awaiting Execution For Participating In The War, After His Capture In 1863. From The Time She Moved To Shakopee, Eight Years Before The War, Sarah Wakefield Was Acquainted With Many Dakota From His Band. The Town Had Been Named For His Father, Shak-Pay, Whose Village Was Nearby. Chaska, Her Protector, Was One Of The Shak-Pay Villagers With Whom She'd Had Some Acquaintance.

Young Shak-Pay, Awaiting Execution For Participating In The War, After His Capture In 1863. From The Time She Moved To Shakopee, Eight Years Before The War, Sarah Wakefield Was Acquainted With Many Dakota From His Band. The Town Had Been Named For His Father, Shak-Pay, Whose Village Was Nearby. Chaska, Her Protector, Was One Of The Shak-Pay Villagers With Whom She'd Had Some Acquaintance.

Rain In The Face,Lakota

“Ite Omagaju, Rain in the Face. Hunkpapa and Dakota. Participated in the Little Big Horn Battle. Died on Standing Rock. "I thought of his 2 years in prison at Ft. Lincoln where I ran today” ~Chase Iron Eyes

Lakota tipi, ca. 1890–1910. South Dakota. Muslin, paint. (20/7873) (Photo by Wayne Smith, NMAI)

Lakota tipi, South Dakota, ca. Our ancestors believed in the Medicine Wheel and Circle of Life. When you fit one upon the other, you will see your world in its true form.

Dakota Sioux- Rainbow warrior

The dog was the only work animal indigenous Americans had until the horse was introduced. In many native languages the word for horse derives from dog. - Doctor Barkman Speaks: History and vintage photos of Native American dogs

Good Horse, Dakota Chief

Good Horse, Dakota Chief - Portraits of Native Americans by David Frances Barry, American photographer (b. 1854 - d.

A Native American Lakota Sioux riding horseback on the prairie of South Dakota | Nancy Greifenhagen

A Native American Lakota Sioux riding horseback on the prairie of South Dakota.

Beautiful young Winnebago woman Florence White Mann (NaNaZoGaeWinKah) from Nebraska and married to John Mann II, who is listed on the Wisconsin tribal rolls. Florence had a good knowledge of Ho-Chunk medicine as did her son Ralph Mann. Photo: ca. 1905.

Beautiful young Winnebago woman Florence White Mann (NaNaZoGaeWinKah) from Nebraska and married to John Mann II, who is listed on the Wisconsin tribal rolls. Florence had a good knowledge of Ho-Chunk medicine as did her son Ralph Mann.

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