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Indian Medicine Ceremony

Here for your enjoyment is an absorbing photograph of Night Medicine Men. It was created in 1908 by Edward S. The photo illustrates an Arikara (Sahnish) medicine ceremony with four night men dancing.

Walking Thunder Navajo medicine woman sand painting ceremony Two Gray Hills Arizona

Navajo Sand Painting - Walking Thunder Navajo medicine woman sand painting ceremony - Two Gray Hills Arizona

Above we show a dramatic photo of an Arikara Medicine Ceremony. It was made in 1908 by Edward S. Curtis.    The illustration documents Six Indians standing in line in front of cedar tree, holding rattles and singing.    We have compiled this collection of artwork mainly to serve as a vital educational resource. Contact curator@old-picture.com.

It was made in 1908 by Edward S. The illustration documents Six Indians standing in line in front of cedar tree, holding rattles and singing.

Uqualla: Spiritual leader, medicine man of the Havasupai Nation in the Grand Canyon.

Uqualla: Spiritual leader, medicine man of the Havasupai Nation in the Grand Canyon. He officiated our wedding in Sedona!

Big Hand, a (Sioux Arikara) medicine man. The medicine men among the Indians were usually those men who thought more deeply than the average men in the tribe. They were seen as wise men. Medicine men or spiritual leaders were in a different class than other men of their tribe. This special status was not dependent on their hunting. Contact with other tribes enabled thinkers to build and expand their belief frameworks, so they were more prevalent in tribes that were accessible to outsiders.

Big Hand, a (Sioux Arikara) medicine man. The medicine men among the Indians were usually those men who thought more deeply than the average men in the tribe. They were seen as wise men. Medicine men or spiritual leaders were in a different class than oth

Cheyenne warriors pose for a photograph in 1863, two years after the beginning of the American Civil War. After half a century of violent clashes the hostility between the tribe and the US government culminated in the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876 - which led to the US Cavalry's defeat and the death of General George Armstrong Custer

Fascinating photographs show fierce Cheyenne Indians who killed Custer

Cheyenne warriors pose for a photograph in 1863, two years after the beginning of the American Civil War. After half a century of violent clashes the hostility between the tribe and the US government culminated in the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876 - which led to the US Cavalry's defeat and the death of General George Armstrong Custer

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