Explore Native American Women and more!

“Princess Angeline,” daughter of Chief Seattle  Angeline was born around 1820 in what is today Rainier Beach in Seattle.

“Princess Angeline,” daughter of Chief Seattle Angeline was born around 1820 in what is today Rainier Beach in Seattle. In her native language of Lushootseed, Angeline was called Kikisoblu or Kick-is-om-lo. The name Angeline was given to her by.

Cochise - 1815-1874 Though actually pronounced K-you Ch-Ish, this Apache leader is second only to Geronimo when it comes to that tribe’s historical significance. Often described as having the classical Indian frame; muscular, large for the time, and known to wear his long, black hair in a traditional pony tail, Cochise aided in the uprising to resist intrusions by Mexicans and American in the 19th century.

the legendary Cochise, Chiricahua Apache, and His Wife . This is the only picture I have ever seen of Cochise- if it is him- he had a great aversion to photography, as did many First Nation people.

Takes Enemy, Sioux warrior. Photographed by Gertrude Kasebier, circa 1898.

Takes Enemy, Sioux warrior. Photographed by Gertrude Kasebier, circa very stern face as a young man

White Bull - Crow - 1883

Chief White Bull (Sioux) born in cousin of Sitting Bull. He is thought to have killed Custer.

This picture was taken in 1908. It is another portrait by Edward Curtis. The photograph shows an Apsaroke  mother and child.

American Indian Mother holding her Child. It was taken in 1908 by Edward S. The image shows a Portrait of a Native American woman in a half-length, seated, facing right, position holding her baby in a beaded cradleboard.

Pinterest
Search