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Ainu Robe (chikarkarpe) - The two methods of embelishing the Ainu robes are applique and embroidery, usually combined harmoniously; the severe applique outlines softened by the delicate undulating embroidery. The iconography combines two elements- ovoid motifs and curves used to create a netlike pattern to trap the evil spirits. The design is always symmetrical but as it is done freehand it is never perfectly so. It is also continuous front to back. The body of this ...

Ainu Robe (chikarkarpe) - The two methods of embelishing the Ainu robes are applique and embroidery, usually combined harmoniously; the severe applique outlines softened by the delicate undulating embroidery. The iconography combines two elements- ovoid motifs and curves used to create a netlike pattern to trap the evil spirits. The design is always symmetrical but as it is done freehand it is never perfectly so. It is also continuous front to back. The body of this ...

Ainu coat

Ainu coat

Ainu clothes called "rurunpe" were elaborately embroidered with delicate applique. These traditional clothes can be seen only in a limited area, including Shiraoi.

Ainu clothes called "rurunpe" were elaborately embroidered with delicate applique. These traditional clothes can be seen only in a limited area, including Shiraoi.

ainu-cicaracarpe4.jpg (721×938)

ainu-cicaracarpe4.jpg (721×938)

Local fashion: Ainu people costume and jewelry

Local fashion: Ainu people costume and jewelry

Ainu ~ Attush man’s robe    Hokkaido, Japan, 19th century    Attush (inner bark from an elm tree) with cotton applique and embroidery    The patterns around the openings and edges of the robe are believed by the Ainu to protect the wearer from evil gods which can enter the garment through gaps in the clothing.  This is an early and wonderful example of its type.

Ainu ~ Attush man’s robe Hokkaido, Japan, 19th century Attush (inner bark from an elm tree) with cotton applique and embroidery The patterns around the openings and edges of the robe are believed by the Ainu to protect the wearer from evil gods which can enter the garment through gaps in the clothing. This is an early and wonderful example of its type.

ainu dress

LOOK AT THESE FABULOUS ANKARA STYLES

ainu dress

Ainu robe Period: Meiji period (1868–1912) Culture: Japan Medium: Cotton and wool with applique (kiri-fuse) Dimensions: Overall: 48 1/4 x 50 1/2 in. (122.6 x 128.3 cm)

Ainu robe Period: Meiji period (1868–1912) Culture: Japan Medium: Cotton and wool with applique (kiri-fuse) Dimensions: Overall: 48 1/4 x 50 1/2 in. (122.6 x 128.3 cm)

Made by the Ainu people in the early 19th century, the ground cloth is elm bark fiber with cotton applique and tambour stitch embroidery.

Mae Festa: My First Forty Years of Collecting

Made by the Ainu people in the early 19th century, the ground cloth is elm bark fiber with cotton applique and tambour stitch embroidery.

Lbritish museum 2

Lbritish museum 2

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