Explore Fertility Symbols, Cyprus, and more!

The Idol of Pomos, is a prehistoric sculpture from the Cypriot village of Pomos. It dates back to the Chalcolithic period, (ca 3000 BC) The sculpture is on display in the Cyprus Archaeological Museum in Nicosia. The idol represents a woman with her arms spread. Many similar idols have been found on Cyprus. Probably used as a fertility symbol, smaller versions were worn as amulets around the neck, just as this idol wears a small copy of itself.

'Idol of Pomos' - Chalcolithic cruciform figurine, Cyprus

Double cruciform figurine  picrolite  Chalcolithic period  3900-2500 BC

The Museum of Cycladic Art is dedicated to the study and promotion of ancient cultures of the Aegean and Cyprus, with special emphasis on Cycladic Art of the millennium BC

Babylonian Goddess Ashtarte Ishtar Statue 2000 BC (also known by other names in other cultures, such as Eastre, Astarte, Artemis, fertility goddesses. This is the goddess behind Easter celebrations.

Babylonian Goddess Ashtarte Ishtar Statue 2000 BC (also known by other names in other cultures, such as Eastre, Astarte, Artemis, fertility goddesses. This is the goddess behind Easter celebrations

Terracotta female figurine holding a child, bronze age Cyprus

Terracotta figure holding an infant BC Late Cypriot II Culture (Cyprus)

AN ANATOLIAN BRONZE IDOL CIRCA 2ND MILLENNIUM B.C. The stylized anthropomorphic votive with an ovoid head on a rectangular neck and projecting triangular arms, the face delineated on one side with m-shaped brows merging with the nose in high relief, pellet eyes below, the slit mouth incised, two rows of stippling arching above, one row curved up below

AN ANATOLIAN BRONZE IDOL CIRCA 2ND MILLENNIUM B.C. The stylized anthropomorphic votive with an ovoid head on a rectangular neck and projecting triangular arms, the face delineated on one side with m-shaped brows merging with the nose in high relief, pellet eyes below, the slit mouth incised, two rows of stippling arching above, one row curved up below

Köşk Höyük / Mother goddess figurine / 5500-5000 BCE / Baked clay / Niğde Museum, Turkey / Kösk Höyük was possibly an important obsidian trade center both in the Neolithic and in the Chalcolithic Periods. The mother goddess figurines; bulls' heads and polychrome ceramics at the site of Kösk Höyük have many similarities with the sites of Çatalhöyük; Can Hasan and Hacilar.

Our ancient teachers :: El Libertario

Japanese Wonder ceramic figurine "DOGU".   B.C.3000 - 2000.   This figurine was unearthed on Imojiya Minami-alups Yamanashi Japan.

STAR GATES: B.C Japanese Wonder ceramic figurine "DOGU". This figurine was unearthed on Imojiya Minami-alups Yamanashi Japan.

Neolithic mother goddess figurine, Sardinia, 5th millennium BCE. Evidence of increasingly elaborate island culture at this time.

Mother goddess figurine statuette - Neolithic Age, from ancient Sardinia, circa c.

Iran, 1st century BC    The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Statuette of a female Period: Iron Age II Date: ca. early millennium B. Geography: Northwestern Iran, Caspian region Medium: Ceramic Dimensions: H. cm Classification: Ceramics-Sculpture Credit Line: Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1964 Accession Number:

Limestone male Etruscan head  C.600B.C Cyprus

Limestone male head Period: Archaic Date: late century B. Culture: Cypriot Medium: Limestone Dimensions: Overall: 15 x 9 x 11 in. x x cm) Classification: Stone Sculpture Credit Line: The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, Accession Number:

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