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Canadian Heroines 2-Book Bundle: 100 Canadian Heroines / 100 More Canadian ... - Merna Forster - Google Books

Canadian Heroines 2-Book Bundle: 100 Canadian Heroines / 100 More Canadian ... - Merna Forster - Google Books

Robert McGee was scalped at age 13 while on the Santa Fe trail in a wagon train near Larned, KS...the rest of his group was slaughtered...this photo was taken 25 years later... unbelievable...

Robert McGee was scalped at age 13 while on the Santa Fe trail in a wagon train near Larned, KS...the rest of his group was slaughtered...this photo was taken 25 years later... unbelievable...

1858, Florence Nightingale, photo not discovered until 2006. Florence Nightingale, one of nursing’s most important figures, gained worldwide attention for her work as a nurse during the Crimean War. She was dubbed “The Lady with the Lamp” after her habit of making rounds at night to tend to injured soldiers. Early photographs of Florence Nightingale are very rare because she was extremely reluctant to be photographed, partly for religious reasons.

1858, Florence Nightingale, photo not discovered until 2006. Florence Nightingale, one of nursing’s most important figures, gained worldwide attention for her work as a nurse during the Crimean War. She was dubbed “The Lady with the Lamp” after her habit of making rounds at night to tend to injured soldiers. Early photographs of Florence Nightingale are very rare because she was extremely reluctant to be photographed, partly for religious reasons.

The three women pictured in this incredible photograph from 1885 -- Anandibai Joshi of India, Keiko Okami of Japan, and Sabat Islambouli of Syria -- each became the first licensed female doctors in their respective countries. The three were students at the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania; one of the only places in the world at the time where women could study medicine.

The three women pictured in this incredible photograph from 1885 -- Anandibai Joshi of India, Keiko Okami of Japan, and Sabat Islambouli of Syria -- each became the first licensed female doctors in their respective countries. The three were students at the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania; one of the only places in the world at the time where women could study medicine.

The Mad Hatter has a basis in real history. In the 18th and 19th centuries, mercury was used to treat felt used in the production of hats in England. Workers in hat factories were exposed to toxic levels of the heavy metal and often led to the onset of dementia.

The Mad Hatter has a basis in real history. In the 18th and 19th centuries, mercury was used to treat felt used in the production of hats in England. Workers in hat factories were exposed to toxic levels of the heavy metal and often led to the onset of dementia.

Susie King Taylor: first African American army nurse; the  only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences; also the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia.

17 Unsung Heroes Of Black History

Susie King Taylor: first African American army nurse; the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences; also the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia.

An East German soldier helping a boy cross the newly formed Berlin Wall -1961

An East German soldier helping a boy cross the newly formed Berlin Wall -1961

June 17, 1865 Susan La Flesche Picotte born on the Omaha Indian Reservation, in northeast Nebraska. Picotte, the first Native American woman to become a doctor in the United States, was born in 1865 and grew up on the Omaha Reservation. She left in 1884 to attend the Hampton Institute in Virginia and later earned a medical degree at the Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania. She returned to the reservation and worked as a physician there until 1894. Working in private practice, she…

June 17, 1865 Susan La Flesche Picotte born on the Omaha Indian Reservation, in northeast Nebraska. Picotte, the first Native American woman to become a doctor in the United States, was born in 1865 and grew up on the Omaha Reservation. She left in 1884 to attend the Hampton Institute in Virginia and later earned a medical degree at the Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania. She returned to the reservation and worked as a physician there until 1894. Working in private practice, she…

The First Female Physician in Alabama

The First Female Physician in Alabama

Victorian fake hair chignon

Victorian fake hair chignon

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