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The entrance to the Chapel of Hathor at Hatshehpsut's Mortuary at Der al-Bahri IterArte Roma

The entrance to the Chapel of Hathor at Hatshehpsut's Mortuary at Der al-Bahri IterArte Roma

Chapel of Asar, Temple of Seti l, Abydos by fessell810

Chapel of Asar, Temple of Seti l, Abydos by fessell810

Carrelage - Tipaza (Algérie)

Carrelage - Tipaza (Algérie)

VISIT: Villa of Livia, the wife of Augustus ... [ita] http://www.romeandart.eu/it/roma-eventi.html

VISIT: Villa of Livia, the wife of Augustus ... [ita] http://www.romeandart.eu/it/roma-eventi.html

The Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut, located beneath the cliffs at Deir el Bahari on the west bank of the Nile near the Valley of the Kings in Egypt. by Scryc

The Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut, located beneath the cliffs at Deir el Bahari on the west bank of the Nile near the Valley of the Kings in Egypt. by Scryc

The ruins of a kiosk discovered in Naga, religious site near to the ancient Kush city of Meroe, where the rulers were one of the earliest civilisations in the Nile region

Meroë in Sudan, the World Heritage Site that remains in Egypt's shadow

The ruins of a kiosk discovered in Naga, religious site near to the ancient Kush city of Meroe, where the rulers were one of the earliest civilisations in the Nile region

Naqa or Naga'a (Arabic: ‏النقعة‎ an-Naqʿa) is a ruined ancient city of the Kushitic Kingdom of Meroë in modern-day Sudan. The ancient city lies about 170 kilometers north-east of Khartoum and about 50 kilometers east of the Nile River. The site has two notable temples, one devoted to Amun and the other to Apedemak which also has a Roman kiosk nearby.

Naqa or Naga'a (Arabic: ‏النقعة‎ an-Naqʿa) is a ruined ancient city of the Kushitic Kingdom of Meroë in modern-day Sudan. The ancient city lies about 170 kilometers north-east of Khartoum and about 50 kilometers east of the Nile River. The site has two notable temples, one devoted to Amun and the other to Apedemak which also has a Roman kiosk nearby.

Arch of Alexander Severus, Dougga Tunisia. The Gabinii were a very wealthy family of Thugga. They often held the office of Imperial flamen (priest) and they promoted the construction of several monuments. During the reign of Emperor Alexander Severus they built a large shrine dedicated to Juno Caelestis to the west of the town which required the construction of a road.

Arch of Alexander Severus, Dougga Tunisia. The Gabinii were a very wealthy family of Thugga. They often held the office of Imperial flamen (priest) and they promoted the construction of several monuments. During the reign of Emperor Alexander Severus they built a large shrine dedicated to Juno Caelestis to the west of the town which required the construction of a road.

The Temple of Kom Ombo is an unusual double temple built during the Ptolemaic dynasty in the Egyptian town of Kom Ombo. The building is unique because its 'double' design meant there were courts, halls, sanctuaries & rooms duplicated for 2 sets of gods. The temple was started by Ptolemy VI Philometor (180-145 BC) at the beginning of his reign & added to by other Ptolemys, most notably Ptolemy XIII (51-47 BC), who built the inner and outer hypostyle halls. (V)

The Temple of Kom Ombo is an unusual double temple built during the Ptolemaic dynasty in the Egyptian town of Kom Ombo. The building is unique because its 'double' design meant there were courts, halls, sanctuaries & rooms duplicated for 2 sets of gods. The temple was started by Ptolemy VI Philometor (180-145 BC) at the beginning of his reign & added to by other Ptolemys, most notably Ptolemy XIII (51-47 BC), who built the inner and outer hypostyle halls. (V)

El Djem, Tunisia ~ Roman Thysdrus prospered in the 2nd century, when it became an important center of olive oil manufacturing for export. By the early 3rd century AD, when the amphitheater was built, Thysdrus rivaled Hadrumetum (modern Sousse) as the second city of Roman North Africa, after Carthage. However, following the abortive revolt that began there in 238 AD, and Gordian I's suicide in his villa near Carthage, Roman troops loyal to the Emperor Maximinus Thrax destroyed the city.

El Djem, Tunisia ~ Roman Thysdrus prospered in the 2nd century, when it became an important center of olive oil manufacturing for export. By the early 3rd century AD, when the amphitheater was built, Thysdrus rivaled Hadrumetum (modern Sousse) as the second city of Roman North Africa, after Carthage. However, following the abortive revolt that began there in 238 AD, and Gordian I's suicide in his villa near Carthage, Roman troops loyal to the Emperor Maximinus Thrax destroyed the city.

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