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Inlay panel from the soundbox of a lyre, from Ur. c. 2600 BCE Shell and bitumen, 12 ¼ X 4 ½ ".

Inlay panel from the soundbox of a lyre, from Ur. 2600 BCE Shell and bitumen, 12 ¼ X 4 ½ ".

Inlay panel from the soundbox of a lyre, from Ur; c. 2600 B.C.; Gold, lapis lazuli, shell and bitumen; 12 1/4 x 4 1/2" (31.1 x 11.3 cm); the top and bottom panels are from the epic of Gilgamesh; the central panels are as yet  of unknown Sumerian legend (possibly an animal fable). Ancient Mesopotamian

rosejonathanselavy: soundbox of bull-headed lyre from a royal grave of Ur, circa 2600 BC. (Much later, 2000 BC - 1700 BC)

Legacy of Tiamat

The demon-god Pazuzu peers over the edge of this bronze plaque. Top: symbols of the Babylonian chief gods;

Plaque with a figure in an Egyptian-style red crown, slaying a griffin. Neo-Assyrian ca. 9th–8th century B.C. Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu) Culture: Assyrian  Medium: Ivory

Plaque with a figure in an Egyptian-style red crown, slaying a griffin. Neo-Assyrian ca. Mesopotamia, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu) Culture: Assyrian Medium: Ivory (> B.

A Sumerian king (right) has a drink while being attended by a servant. The king is holding a shepherd's flail, a symbol of authority. The servant holds his hand under his armpit as a gesture of obedience. Detail from a lyre inlay, partially restored.

A Sumerian king (right) has a drink while being attended by a servant. The king is holding a shepherd's flail, a symbol of authority. The servant holds his hand under his armpit as a gesture of obedience. Detail from a lyre inlay, partially restored.

Geb dios egipcio de la Tierra

Geb was frequently described mythologically as father of snakes (one of the names for snake was – "son of the earth") and also is who create earthquakes when laugh

Dur-Sharrukin. Alabaster bas-relief from the palace of Sargon II, ca 721-705 BC. Neo-Assyrian

A servant leading the royal horses. Alabaster bas-relief BCE) from the palace of Sargon II in Khorsabad, Mesopotamia (Iraq).

The Uruk Vase showing worshippers bringing provisions to the temple of Inanna.  [The vase was stolen from the Iraq Museum in 2003, but has since been returned and partially restored.]  Uruk ca. 3000 BC

Uruk Vase showing worshippers bringing provisions to the temple of Inanna. Uruk, ca. 3000 BC [The vase was stolen from the Iraq Museum in but has since been returned and partially restored.

A Sumerian warrior (perhaps the King himself) takes capture of two enemies and strip them of everything. The Standard of Ur

The Sumerians sometimes used curved sickle swords as seen in this detail from the Standard of Ur, where the Sumerian king captures the enemy king.

Here's the sheet music for the oldest song in the world: The song was discovered in the ancient Syrian city of Ugarit in the early Fifties, and then deciphered by Prof. Anne Draffkorn K. The tablets containing the notation were about 3,400 years old, and contained cuneiform signs in the hurrian language that provided musical notation of a complete cult hymn. It's thought to be the oldest preserved song with notation in the world, and predates the next earliest example of harmony by 1,400…

Listen to the Oldest Song in the World: A Sumerian Hymn Written Years Ago Open Culture