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Loved by many, despised by others, “Dixie” is still among the most recognizable of all American songs.  Ironically, it was written by a Northerner, Daniel Decatur Emmett.  Bryant’s (blackface) Minstrels premiered it in New York City on April 4, 1859.  “I Wish I Was in Dixie’s Land” was an instant hit, and...

“Dixie” was one of the most popular songs to have emerged in the United States during the century. As all roads began leading to the Civil War, “Dixie” reinforced and s…

The Civil War, Part 2: The People

The Civil War, Part 2: The People

Civil War: Federal Leaders of the Civil War. #genealogy #CivilWar #military

Barnes Historical Series A Brief History of the United States by Joel Dorman Steele, Ph. and Esther Baker Steele, Lit.D American Book Company 1900

John Singleton Mosby (December 6, 1833 – May 30, 1916), nicknamed the "Gray Ghost", was a Confederate Army cavalry battalion commander in the American Civil War. His command, the 43rd Battalion, 1st Virginia Cavalry, known as Mosby's Rangers or Mosby's Raiders, was a partisan ranger unit noted for its lightning quick raids.

Confederate Colonel John Singleton Mosby aka 'The Gray Ghost' of the Virginia Volunteer Cavalry Battalion

When 17-year-old Union officer Galusha Pennypacker was brevetted as a major general, he became the youngest person on either side to attain that rank during the Civil War. Born June 1, 1844, he wasn’t even old enough to vote until a few weeks after the war ended.

When Union officer Galusha Pennypacker was brevetted as a major general, he became the youngest person on either side to attain that rank during the Civil War. Born June he wasn’t even old enough to vote until a few weeks after the war ended.

EXCISION OF HUMERUS.  Rank PVT, Company C, Regiment 5, State NH  Battle: REAM'S STATION, Civil War  Date of Injury: 25 AUG 1864

EXCISION OF HUMERUS. Rank PVT, Company C, Regiment 5, State NH Battle: REAM'S STATION, Civil War Date of Injury: 25 AUG 1864

Even though the fight may be over, the scars can last forever. On September 19, 1863 in the Brock Field at Chickamauga, Jacob Miller of the 9th Indiana Infantry was shot in the face, but survived. 150 years ago, the Civil War was ending, but for men like Jacob Miller, a new fight was just beginning.

American Civil War Veteran Jacob Miller was shot in the forehead on Sept 1863 at Brock Field at Chickamauga. He lived with an open bullet for many years, with the last pieces of lead dropping out 31 years after he was shot. This picture was taken in

ca. 1861-65, [Unidentified young soldier in Union sack coat and forage cap with  musket and sheathed bayonet in front of backdrop showing landscape]   via the Library of Congress, Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs

[Unidentified young soldier in Union sack coat and forage cap with musket and sheathed bayonet in front of backdrop showing landscape] via the Library of Congress, Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs

American Civil War | American Civil War Part 26

Captain Horatio G. Gibson (second from left) and Officers of His Battery – Near Fair Oaks, VA, June 1862

Two Union soldiers, the young one on the left is a 'Zouave'. Circa 1862.

Captain Harrison H. Jeffords (right) and another young Union Zouave of the Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment posing in front of a tent in an unidentified tent during the Civil War. Attributed to Mathew Brady.

Captain Hays, bearer of the American Civil War's most coveted medal - "Mustaches Beyond and Above the Call of Duty".

8 by 10 Civil War photo Print Cavalry Captain Hays

8 by 10 Civil War photo Print Cavalry Captain Hays in Collectibles, Militaria, Civil War Reenactment & Reproductions, Photographs

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