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Unknown man and girl, circa 1867. Stand behind the chair supports the deceased child. It looks like she is also holding the tell-tale broken rose, also.

Postmortem photo: Unknown man and girl, circa Stand behind the chair supports the deceased child. It looks like she is also holding the tell-tale broken rose, also.

An extremely rare tintype of a young girl with what I believe is either Apert Syndrome or Crouzon's. This condition was not even officially described until decades after this photo was taken (1870's). If you look closely at her hands, you can see they are oddly formed, most likely with fused fingers.

An extremely rare tintype of a young girl with what I believe is either Apert Syndrome or Crouzon's. This condition was not even officially described until decades after this photo was taken

In the nineteenth century, a morbid and curious custom has spread to various parts of the world: the photos were ”Post Mortem”.”Post Mortem” comes from Latin, meaning after death.The photos ”Post Mortem” apparently originated in England, when Queen Victoria asked to photograph the corpse of an acquaintance or a relative, so she can keep as a souvenir.soon after, this idea spread around the world (the girl who is standing in the photo is the one who is dead)

Typically, a post-mortem photograph depicted the dead person in a peaceful state of repose, as in a blissful deep sleep. But some of these post-mortem photos went further. Sometimes they liked to pose the deceased as if he/she was living:

I just love these pictures. Makes me wonder about what life was like, their thoughts, dreams.

the child on the left is definitely propped up by a stand but both girls hands are discolored and eyes look painted making me think both are deceased

A list of reasons to be admitted to a Victorian asylum. Based on this I think we're all in.

An amazing list of actual reasons for admission into the Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum from the late Crazzzzy! I would ve admitted for at leqst ine reason:laziness

Memento Mori - both ladies are deceased

This site exists to discredit the idea of the Victorian standing post mortem photo. Post mortem photos do exist, but none of them are stand alone.

post mortem photography... this poor little girl is propped up and posed for a souvenir for the family...

No such thing as a standing postmortem photograph. Posing stands were used to keep living subjects still during long exposures, and far too flimsy to support dead weight.

Myrtle Corbin was known far and wide in the late nineteenth century as the Four-Legged Woman. While at a glance one could plainly see four legs dangling beyond the hem of her dress – only one pair belonged to her, the other set to her dipygus twin sister. Born in Lincoln County, TN in 1868, …

Myrtle Corbin was known far and wide in the late nineteenth century as the Four-Legged Woman. While at a glance one could plainly see four legs dangling beyond the hem of her dress – only one pair belonged to her, the other set to her dipygus twin sister.

As you can see there is a standing post behind the girl. And she is ALIVE! This is not a postmortem photo. There is no such thing as a standing PM photo. Her eyes are painted in. This is because the exposure time was more then 10 minutes and eyelids move thus become blurry on the photo.

The ominous "posing stand" was spotted behind this pretty little tyke and that was enough to label her postmortem forever in some peoples' eyes. We know, of course, that posing stands were used ONLY with live subjects.

1860s - Emancipated Slave Children ... Slave children, freed and brought North by abolitionists to emphasize the plight of slaves. The proceeds from sale of the photographs were to be used to educate freed slaves who had come under the jurisdiction of the Union Army in the New Orleans area. A caption on the reverse of one of these photographs points out that the children had been turned out of a hotel in Philadelphia because of their “color.”

Kimball American (active Rebecca, an Emancipated Slave, from New Orleans, 1863 Photograph, Carte-de-visite Am.

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