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William Cooper Nell, African-American abolitionist, historian, journalist, and civil servant was born on Dec. 16, 1816. Nell was one of the first people to record extensive African American history (a people's historian!) and an activist for school desegregation in Boston. He launched a petition drive among African American parents in Boston, a first step in the 100 year campaign that led to the Brown v. Board decision.

William Cooper Nell, African-American abolitionist, historian, journalist, and civil servant was born on Dec. 16, 1816. Nell was one of the first people to record extensive African American history (a people's historian!) and an activist for school desegregation in Boston. He launched a petition drive among African American parents in Boston, a first step in the 100 year campaign that led to the Brown v. Board decision.

Born into slavery in 1841, Blanche Kelso Bruce became the first African American to serve a full term in the U.S. Senate, as well as the first African American to preside over the Senate.

Born into slavery in 1841, Blanche Kelso Bruce became the first African American to serve a full term in the U.S. Senate, as well as the first African American to preside over the Senate.

Louis L. Redding (October 25, 1901 - September  28, 1998) taught at Morehouse before attending Harvard Law School and becoming the first African American attorney in Delaware in 1929. He specialized in civil rights work, including a suit to integrate the state universities (1950) and Gebhart v Belton (1952) which became part of Brown v Board of Education. #TodayInBlackHistory

Louis L. Redding (October 25, 1901 - September 28, 1998) taught at Morehouse before attending Harvard Law School and becoming the first African American attorney in Delaware in 1929. He specialized in civil rights work, including a suit to integrate the state universities (1950) and Gebhart v Belton (1952) which became part of Brown v Board of Education. #TodayInBlackHistory

First African-American woman to train and graduate as a RN in Buffalo, NY

First African-American woman to train and graduate as a RN in Buffalo, NY

George Franklin Grant (Sept. 15, 1846 – August 21, 1910) was the first African American professor at Harvard. He was also a Boston dentist, and inventor of a wooden "golf tee". He was born in Oswego, New York to Phillis Pitt and Tudor Elandor Grant. He entered the Harvard School of Dental Medicine in 1868, and graduated in 1870. He then took a position in the department of mechanical dentistry in 1871, making him Harvard University's first African-American faculty member.

George Franklin Grant (Sept. 15, 1846 – August 21, 1910) was the first African American professor at Harvard. He was also a Boston dentist, and inventor of a wooden "golf tee". He was born in Oswego, New York to Phillis Pitt and Tudor Elandor Grant. He entered the Harvard School of Dental Medicine in 1868, and graduated in 1870. He then took a position in the department of mechanical dentistry in 1871, making him Harvard University's first African-American faculty member.

Shoshana Johnson  First African American Woman POW/Speaker  The first African American POW, Johnson was held hostage for 22 days in Iraq, and survived her captivity despite enduring bullet wounds in both of her ankles. Her heroic story is chronicled with vivid honesty in her...

Shoshana Johnson First African American Woman POW/Speaker The first African American POW, Johnson was held hostage for 22 days in Iraq, and survived her captivity despite enduring bullet wounds in both of her ankles. Her heroic story is chronicled with vivid honesty in her...

William Still (1821-1902) called "The Father of the Underground Railroad" helped as many as 800 slaves escape to freedom interviewing each person & keeping careful records including brief biography & destination of each person awa alias that they adopted   records kept carefully hidden  worked with other Underground Railroad agents operating in the south & many counties in southern Pennsylvania

William Still (1821-1902) called "The Father of the Underground Railroad" helped as many as 800 slaves escape to freedom interviewing each person & keeping careful records including brief biography & destination of each person awa alias that they adopted records kept carefully hidden worked with other Underground Railroad agents operating in the south & many counties in southern Pennsylvania

Laurette Hunkson - One of the first African American Girl Scouts

Laurette Hunkson - One of the first African American Girl Scouts

William Wells Brown (circa 1814 – November 6, 1884) was a prominent African-American abolitionist lecturer, novelist, playwright, and historian. Born into slavery in Montgomery County, Kentucky, near the town of Mount Sterling, Brown escaped to the North in 1834, where he worked for abolitionist causes and was a prolific writer. His novel Clotel (1853), considered the first novel written by an African American, was published in London, where he resided at the time.

William Wells Brown (circa 1814 – November 6, 1884) was a prominent African-American abolitionist lecturer, novelist, playwright, and historian. Born into slavery in Montgomery County, Kentucky, near the town of Mount Sterling, Brown escaped to the North in 1834, where he worked for abolitionist causes and was a prolific writer. His novel Clotel (1853), considered the first novel written by an African American, was published in London, where he resided at the time.

African American Pilot Tuskegee Airmen WWII 8x10 Reprint Of Old Photo

African American Pilot Tuskegee Airmen WWII 8x10 Reprint Of Old Photo

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