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William Cooper Nell, African-American abolitionist, historian, journalist, and civil servant was born on Dec. 16, 1816. Nell was one of the first people to record extensive African American history (a people's historian!) and an activist for school desegregation in Boston. He launched a petition drive among African American parents in Boston, a first step in the 100 year campaign that led to the Brown v. Board decision.

William Cooper Nell, African-American abolitionist, historian, journalist, and civil servant was born on Dec. Nell was one of the first people to record extensive African American history (a people's historian!) and an activist for school desegr

Nora Holt was the first African American to earn a master's degree in the USA.    Carl Van Vechten and Nora Holt at Yale, June 22, 1955

Two prominent figures of the Harlem Renaissance: Nora Holt was the first African American to earn a master's degree in the USA. Carl Van Vechten was a patron of the arts, author, & photographer. Van Vechten and Nora Holt seen here at Yale, June

Thomas Nelson Baker, Sr., who was born into slavery in 1860, received a Ph.D. in philosophy in 1903 from Yale University, the first African-American to earn a Ph.D. in philosophy anywhere in the U.S., and the first former slave to do so. (No other African-American earned a Ph.D. in philosophy from Yale until 1946!).

, who was born in received a Ph. in philosophy in 1903 from Yale University. He was the first African-American to earn a Ph. in philosophy anywhere in the U.

Born into slavery in 1841, Blanche Kelso Bruce became the first African American to serve a full term in the U.S. Senate, as well as the first African American to preside over the Senate.

US Senator Blanche Kelso Bruce of Mississippi, Republican Served First black Senator to serve full six year term. Only senator to be a former slave. First black man to preside over the U. Enslaved mother and white father.

By 3500 BC. Blacks in China were raising silkworms and making silk. The culture hero Huang Di is a direct link of Africa.  His name was pronounced in old Chinese Yuhai Huandi or "Hu Nak Kunte." He arrived in China from the west in 2282 BC and settled along the banks of the Loh River in Shanxi.  Picture is of Original clan from Taiwan.....

By 3500 BC. Blacks in China were raising silkworms and making silk.

Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin (8/31/1842 - 3/13/1924) was responsible for the merger of other African American women's organizations into the National Association of Colored Women in 1896. She had previously founded the American Woman Suffrage Association of Boston with Julia Ward Howe and Lucy Stone, and was a member of several other predominantly white women's organizations. Her husband, George Lewis Ruffin, was the first African American graduate of Harvard Law School. #TodayInBlackHistory

Pierre Ruffin (August 1842 - March was responsible for the merger of other African American women's organizati.

Rev. George Lee was assassinated May 7, 1955 in Belzoni MS after having sued for the right to vote. He was a co-founder of the Belzoni NAACP and vice president of the Regional Council of Negro Leadership. His death drew national attention through Jet Magazine and the Chicago Defender. #TodayInBlackHistory

George Lee was assassinated May 1955 in Belzoni MS after having sued for the right to vote. He was a co-founder of the Belzoni NAACP and vice president of the Regional Council of Negro Leadership.

Born in 1872, Wallace Rayfield, was a legendary craftsman who was the second in the nation to be licensed and the first black architect in Alabama. He worked alongside Robert Taylor, the first licensed black architect in history, when the two of them taught at Tuskegee Institute under Booker T. Washington.    Rayfield’s work as an architect consisted of designing the most significant buildings in civil rights history including 16th Street Baptist Church, Ebenezer Baptist Church

Wallace Augustus Rayfield (born March 1873 in Bibb County, Georgia; died February 1941 in Birmingham) was the second formally-educated practicing African American architect in the United States.

Julian Abele was a prominent black architect who built more than 400 buildings. Some of them were the Harvard University Widener Memorial Library, Monmouth University’s Shadow Lawn Mansion, the Central Branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Most importantly, Abele was known for building the Duke University Chapel.

Portrait photograph of Julian Francis Abele, circa Chief designer at the architectural firm of Horace Trumbauer, Abele was responsible for the design of such Philadelphia buildings as the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Free Library of Philadelphia.

Anthony Bowen, who founded the first African American YMCA in 1853

Anthony Bowen, who purchased his own freedom from slavery in Maryland, founded the first YMCA chapter for Black Americans in This was one of the first organizations for Black Americans. Bowen was an abolitionist and advised President Lincoln to.

Rev. Pauli Murray: First female African American Episocopal priest and founder of the National Organization for Women (NOW)

Pauli Murray -- Black, queer, feminist, erased from history: Meet the most important legal scholar you've likely never heard of

Osborne Anderson was the only African American to Survive, among the five Black Men that accompanied John Brown on the raid on Harpers Ferry! In 1861 Anderson wrote A Voice From Harper’s Ferry. He believed that southern accounts were biased, he felt compelled to give an account of the event from the raiders’ perspective. http://www.cafepress.com/gkcstore

Truth Osborne Anderson was the only African American to Survive, among the five Black Men that accompanied John Brown on the raid on Harpers Ferry!

Before graduate student Mike King began using his given name, Martin Luther, before Detroit Red changed his name to Malcolm X, and before Medgar Evers joined the NAACP, civil rights activist Harry T. Moore and his wife, Harritte, were murdered.   He was the first civil rights leader to be assassinated, but few know his name. His murder was the spark that ignited the American civil rights movement, but even fewer know his story.

Civil rights activist Harry T. Moore and his wife, Harritte, were murdered. He was the first civil rights leader to be assassinated, but few know his name. His murder was the spark that ignited the American civil rights movement.

1869 Robert Freeman Tanner becomes the first African American to earn a dental degree (Harvard University). In the same year, Howard University Law School becomes the United States’ first Black law school.

George Franklin Grant was the first African American professor at Harvard. Inventor of golf tee made of wood and a chemical used to cover teeth (he was a dentist). Fascinating information I never would have known.

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