Papago women – 1900. The Tohono O'odham are a group of Native American people who reside primarily in the Sonoran Desert of the southeastern Arizona and northwest Mexico. "Tohono O'odham" means "Desert People." Although they were previously known as the Papago, they have largely rejected this name (meaning literally "tepary-bean eater"), which was applied to them by conquistadores,

Papago women – The Tohono O'odham are a group of Native American people…

Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian - volume 9 facing: page 110 A mat shelter - Skokomish

Papago Indian camp. Mother and two daughters, near Bisbee, AZ. Western History Collections, University of Oklahoma Libraries, Irwin Brothers Studio Collection, Native American Photos

Papago Indian camp. Mother and two daughters, near Bisbee, AZ. Western History Collections, University of Oklahoma Libraries, Irwin Brothers Studio Collection, Native American Photos

Navajo mother and child - circa 1940

Navajo Mother with Baby in a Cradleboard. Another pinner wrote: Still used today, I used this for my daughter for her naps, the designs for the string part has changed though.

Papago Indians, 1902

Official website of the Smithsonian, the world's largest museum and research complex, with 19 museums, 9 research centers, and affiliates around the world.

Papago woman – 1907

1907 photo by Edward S. Curtis of a Papago Indian Woman Gathering Hanamh. The picture presents an interesting view of one of the gathering traditions of the Indians of North America.

Family Group of Four in Doorway of Mud and Pole House 1894 - Papago

Tohono O'odham (Papago) family group in front of a mud and pole house on the San Xavior Reservation in Arizona.

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