Roman marbles in a display at the British Museum, London

Have you ever wondered what toys people had in the ancient world? Here are 10 awesome ancient toys that will make you surprised.

The Romans mostly ate with their fingers. When they were served dished that required utensils, they used spoons and knives. Although forks were  common utensils in the villa, they were usually reserved for cooking use only.

SPAIN / HISPANIA (Roman Spain) - The Romans mostly ate with their fingers. When they were served dished that required utensils, they used spoons and knives. Although forks were common utensils in the villa, they were usually reserved for cooking use only.

Roman Cheese Press of the Roman Period from Lower Halstow, Kent, England. From the collection of the British Museum, London, England.

Roman Cheese Press of the Roman Period from Lower Halstow, Kent, England. From the collection of the British Museum, London, England. press cheese-presses-from-history

Egyptian limestone game "mehen" 2890 BC Mehen is a board game that was played in ancient Egypt. The game was named in reference to Mehen, a mythological snake-god. This is a Mehen gaming board (Naqada III or Early Dynastic, about 3000 BC); exact findspot is not known. It was used together with six lions (sometimes other animals) and six sets of balls/marbles.

Egyptian limestone game "mehen" 2890 BC Mehen is a board game that was played…

Terracotta doll - Roman - Cadiz Museum More At ROMAN ART : FOSTERGINGER @ Pinterest

Terracotta doll - Roman - Cadiz Museum More At ROMAN ART : FOSTERGINGER @ Pinterest

Board game, the so-called "game of 58 holes" Iron Age, c. 11th-9th centuries BC Necropolis B, Tomb 217, Tepe Sialk, Iran Terracotta L. 24 cm; W. 11 cm Roman Ghirshman excavations, 1937 | Louvre Museum | Paris

Game of 58 Holes Iron Age Board Game B.) terra cotta, Necropolis B, Tomb Tepe Sialk, Iran

sisse-brimberg-roman-iron-age-wooden-gameboard-bone-dice-and-amber-playing-pieces

sisse-brimberg-roman-iron-age-wooden-gameboard-bone-dice-and-amber-playing-pieces

This item comes from: Roman Legionary Museum (Item reference: 32.60). A leaden bread-stamp, reading ‘Century of Quintinius Aquila’. Each century, of 80 men, baked its own bread, and sometimes marked it.

This item comes from: Roman Legionary Museum (Item reference: A leaden bread-stamp, reading ‘Century of Quintinius Aquila’. Each century, of 80 men, baked its own bread, and sometimes marked it.

Rock Crystal Dice    1st-2nd Century AD    Roman Imperial Period    (Source: The British Museum)

Rock crystal dice, marked one to six. A Roman rock crystal die (British Museum)

Ancient mosaic glass face & bird beads - exquisite miniature masterpieces of ancient glass bead making. Roman Period ...

Ancient Mosaic Glass Face & Bird Beads - Roman period - exquisite miniature masterpieces of ancient glass bead making x - 11 x

At the time of marriage, a Roman woman gained the right to wear the stola, an undyed wool tunic worn over her other tunic(s). The stola was a symbol of marriage, but wasn't terribly flattering, so many women opted not to wear them. However, the long cloak draped around the body called a palla was very popular. The palla could also be pulled up to cover the head.

At the time of marriage, a Roman woman gained the right to wear the stola, an undyed wool tunic worn over her other tunic(s). The stola was a symbol of marriage, but wasn't terribly flattering, so many women opted not to wear them. However, the long cloak draped around the body called a palla was very popular. The palla could also be pulled up to cover the head.

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