New Zealand | A cropped image of the original painting of Tamati Waka Nene (c.1785-1871) by Gottfried Lindauer, in 1890. | Tamati Waka Nene was a warrior and chieftan of the Ngati-Hoa tribe in the early 19th century.

Maori tattoos are part of the culture of the Indigenous people of New Zealand. Maori facial tattoos never cross the midline of the face and were used to instil fear in invaders.

The native Maori people of New Zealand have tattooed their faces for centuries. They had a complex warrior culture before the arrival of Europeans, and suffered under early colonialism, but have experienced a cultural revival since the 60′s.   The marks are called moko, and are etched with chisels instead of needles to leave grooves along with the ink. The true form is sacred, unique to each. ❣Julianne McPeters❣ no pin limits

bigwordsandsharpedges: “ The native Maori people of New Zealand have tattooed their faces for centuries. They had a complex warrior culture before the arrival of Europeans, and suffered under early colonialism, but have experienced a cultural revival.

These Stunning Photos of New Zealand's Largest Gang Will Give You Sleepless Nights | VICE | United States

These Stunning Photos of New Zealand's Largest Gang Will Give You Sleepless Nights

Jono Rotman decided to portray the dark side of this country, so he visited members of Mighty Mongrel Mob - New Zealand's largest gang.

Tomika Te Mutu, from Bay of Plenty, oil painting by Gottfried Lindauer (c1880)

Tomika Te Mutu, chief of the Ngaiterangi tribe, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand, oil painting by Gottfried Lindauer

A close-up of the painstaking detail that went into a ta moko carving...

How traditional Maori face tattoos called Moko describe without words

A close-up of the painstaking detail that went into a ta moko carving.

A Noble Relic of a Noble Race, Wharekauri Tahuna Aged 102, A Chieftain of the Arawa Tribe

A Noble Relic of a Noble Race, Wharekauri Tahuna Aged A Chieftain of the Arawa Tribe

New Zealand | Head and shoulders portrait of Maori man, Pekama Titara; wearing a white feather in his hair, kaitaka (finely woven flax cloak); with facial moko (tattoo) | Late 19th century | Photographed by Pulman

George Pulman New Zealand. Head and shoulders portrait of Maori man, Pekama Titara; wearing a white feather in his hair, kaitaka (finely woven flax cloak); with facial moko (tattoo).

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