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June 25, 1876 Battle of the Little Bighorn and death of Lt.Colonel George Armstrong Custer. photo Custer Expedition, 1874 Bloody Knife (guide), General Custer, Private Noonen, and Colonel Ludlow, with grizzly killed by Custer, Custer Peak, SD

Pictured from left to right are Bloody Knife, George Armstrong Custer, Private John Noonan, and Captain William Ludlow posing after killing their first grizzly during the Black Hills Expedition of 1874

Lt. Edward S. Godfrey by D.F. Barry in 1876, the same year as the Battle of the Little Bighorn

Edward S. Godfrey by D. Barry in the same year as the Battle of the Little Bighorn

Chief Sitting Bull is arguably the most powerful and most well know Native American chief in history.  Sitting Bull first went to war at the age of 14, but he is best known for his defeat of General George Custer in the Battle of Little Big Horn in 1876, aka Custer's Last Stand.

Sitting Bull - Sitting Bull was a Teton Dakota Indian chief under whom the Sioux tribes united in their struggle for survival on the North American Great Plains.

A great portrait of Rain-In-The-Face, a fearless Sioux Warrior.

A great portrait of Rain-In-The-Face, a fearless Sioux Warrior. Somehow, I believe he belongs on this board. I love rain & I have Sioux in my gene pool.

LITTLE BIG MAN

Little Big Man was at Battle of Little Bighorn , was an armed engagement between combined forces of Lakota, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes, against the Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army. on June 25 and 1876 Crazy Horse and Chief

Crow Indian Gen Custer Scout Hairy Moccasin & White Man Runs Him, Wyoming 1919

Crow Indian Gen Custer Scouts, Hairy Moccasin and White Man Runs Him, Wyoming, 1919

battlefield-bones, Little Big Horn

Some private information in addition to old newspaper clippings. Several Official Reports on the Battlefieid.

White Man Runs Him- Crow. ca. 1910

White Man Runs Him (Mahr-Itah-Thee-Dah-Ka-Roosh) -Crow scout serving with George Armstrong Custer’s 1876 expedition against the Sioux and Northern Cheyenne that culminated in the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

J. Dixon photograph of White Man Runs Him, a Crow which was the chief of Custer's Seventh Cavalry Indian Scouts during the Battle of Little Big Horn. After reporting to Custer the position of the enemy camp, White Man Runs Him and the other scouts were ordered to the rear of the Army lines, which saved their lives.

Cowan& Auctions: The Midwest& Most Trusted Auction House / Antiques / Fine Art / Art Appraisals. Joseph Dixon Photograph of Custer& Scout .

The graves at the Little Big Horn. Their are many reasons why Custer lost this battle. He was to sure of himself. He was totally out numbered. The warriors had quick repeating rifles and his troops didn't and because of his reputation he had no support even though he had sent for it. It has been said that he needed a victory to put him back in the public eye so he could fulfill his ambition to run for the Presidency.

The graves at the Little Big Horn. Their are many reasons why Custer lost this…

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