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6. Klasse ELA

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for 6. Klasse ELA. Get inspired and try out new things.

Teaching theme and summarizing can be challenging, but with my tips, guides, and resources to help with your methodology, you can be successful!

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Spending waaaay too much personal time trying to figure out how to embed reading & writing into your Middle School ELA class? I've been there! Grab your free week-long lesson plans for 6th, 7th, and 8th grade here and let me know how much time these goodies will save you!

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Use these 6th grade writing prompts to help your students form opinions, explore their ideas on paper, and express their thoughts with confidence.

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In an earlier blog post, I wrote about the benefits of assigning a collaborative writing assignment in the high school English and middle school ELA classroom. In the post, one of the benefits included less grading. And to be completely honest, that is why I switched up my sophomores' recent short story paragraph about "The Veldt." I was already behind on grading various writing assignments, and so I decided a collaborative paragraph was the way to go. As I switched gears from an individual Jane Schaffer literary analysis paragraph to a collaborative paragraph, I thought about how I could make the activity even more beneficial for my students. It was still early in the school year, and I was still working on writing instruction with my students -primarily on how to properly embed quotes and write thoughtful commentary. So, I decided to have my students color-code each element of the paragraph. This was my way to get students actively thinking about every single paragraph element. Not only did they need to include these various elements in their paragraphs, but they also needed to color-code them to show me that they understood the aspects. For the paragraph, students analyzed how Ray Bradbury developed the theme in his short story "The Veldt." This is a prompt that comes straight from the standards, and students needed to identify how the theme emerged, and how Bradbury fully developed it by the end of the story. I wrote out explicit directions for the collaborative paragraph assignment on my whiteboard. I even color-coded it to show my students exactly how I wanted them to color-code their paragraphs. Paragraph Color-Coding Instructions Sentence 1: Topic Sentence Write the topic sentence in purple. For the topic sentence, my students needed to include the GTAP: genre, title, author, purpose (of the paragraph -in this case, the purpose was to show how Bradbury developed the theme). Sentence 2: Concrete detail #1 Students introduced the quote in green, wrote the quote in blue, and provided the MLA parenthetical citation in red. This quote was the first event from the story in which they felt the theme emerged. Sentences 3-4: Commentary Students wrote their commentary that explained the quote and analyzed how the event connected to the purpose of the paragraph in black. For commentary writing, I don't allow my students to include the word "quote." It's a tough habit to break, but they can manage it with practice. Sentence 5: Concrete detail #2 Like above, students introduced the quote in green, wrote the quote in blue, and provided the MLA parenthetical citation in red. This quote was a subsequent event from the story that showed the theme fully-developed. Sentences 6-7: Commentary Students wrote their commentary that explained the quote and analyzed how the event connected to the purpose of the paragraph in black. For commentary writing, I don't allow my students to include the word "quote." It's a tough habit to break, but they can manage it with practice. Sentence 8: Concluding Sentence Students write this sentence in orange. For a theme-based literary analysis paragraph, students connect the theme back to society today. How the Activity Worked My students worked together in their table groups for this assignment. They sit in tables of either five or six students. While I think this would have been better in groups of 2-4, it did work with larger groups. To help encourage every student to participate actively, I provided my students with ways they could help their table groups. Then, I walked around and actively monitored their progress. In all honesty, I thought this process would take one class period from start to finish, and it did not. My students needed an additional 15 minutes the following day to complete their paragraphs. However, I utilized the remaining time the second day for peer review. One way that students become stronger writers is by reading what others write, and so that is what we did. On the second day, I had my students get together in smaller groups for the second component of the activity. They got into groups of 2-3 people, and they had to choose people outside of their table groups. In their new groups, students, went around the room and read and evaluated all of the paragraphs. I created a paragraph evaluation form, and with that form, students analyzed each paragraph on a sentence-by-sentence level. You can download this peer evaluation form HERE! Why Collaborative Writing Works This assignment was a big success, and now that my students have gone through this process, I know that they've practiced proper Jane Schaffer writing. As they were working on their paragraphs, my students brainstormed together, wrote together, and edited their work together. Since it was a collaborative assignment, they did all of this out loud as they communicated with each other various ways to write and improve their paragraphs. Even for the students who were less hands-on during the writing process, they were present and overheard their peers work their way through a paragraph. To reinforce everything that my students did together in their groups as they wrote their paragraphs, they then went around the room and read five other paragraphs. And even though they might not have realized it at the time, they were comparing and evaluative the paragraphs, and in that process, they became stronger writers. Where I'll Take This Next Now that my students have completed this work, I have quite a few model paragraphs to hang up throughout my classroom. I'll use these examples as model texts as we continue our short story unit and begin to start writing our first multi-paragraph of the school year. While I purposefully include strategies like this that haver built-in scaffolding and differentiation for my EL students and students with IEPs, these strategies help all learners. Some of my students will rely on these strategies and color-coded class texts more than others, and that is okay. As they gain experience writing and grow into more confident writers, they will slowly stop relying on these posters. And once that happens, once the students gradually stop using the scaffolding, that is when the real mastery happens. We can't expect our students to master elements of paragraph writing and essay writing with just one lesson and one writing assignment. It's a gradual process that takes time, and it is one that we, as teachers, should continuously strive to help them build. Writing Resources: Mastering the Essay: A Unit to Teach Essay Writing Writing Spotlight Bundle: Improve Student Writing Peer Editing Made Easy

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I recently assigned a one-pager final project to my sophomores for their culminating Night project. I wanted to combine as many rigorous ELA content ideas as possible, while also designing a fun project for students that provided them with a bit of choice. To make this project rigorous, I required my students to include multiple MLA-cited quotations with a literary analysis explanation. These are skills my students have learned and practiced all year long, so it was a way for me to assess that skill. I also wanted to give my students an opportunity to express their creativity, and it came through. For the actual assignment, I created a one-pager choice board that is similar that requires students to connect four elements. Every student had to complete the quotes, questions, and images element of the project. From there, students had their choice of four different items they could include: a connection to a song, a timeline, a setting, or a figurative language option. By providing students with a choice, they feel like they have more say with their work. I reviewed the assignment with my students, explained my expectations, passed out the handout (which was printed double-sided with the instructions on the front and the brainstorming organizer and checklist on the back), and showed my students some examples. Keep reading the post. You can sign-up for my emails to receive a free Google Docs copy of this assignment which includes the assignment, checklist, planning sheet, and a rubric. I first assigned the project on a Friday to give my students an extra weekend to work on the project. I also provided my students with large paper (11x17inch) for the assignment. Only a few students took advantage of this extra time, but I recommend giving some extra time. I also dedicated two class periods to work on this project, and most of them needed to commit outside class time on this project as well. On the day projects were due, I provided my students with an opportunity to present their one-page to class. I did this as an extra-credit option. For each student who volunteered to present their project, I gave them an extra 5 points on their project). The Night One-Pager was an enjoyable project for my students, and it was the perfect final project to assign at the end of the school year. Subscribe to Receive the One-Pager You'll receive the one-pager assignment as a Google Doc link. Thank you for subscribing. Please check your email. Once you confirm your email you'll receive the one-pager. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again. Email Address I'd like to receive the free email course. Subscribe We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit This post contains an affiliate link.

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While the importance of classic novels is undisputed, sometimes it is good to switch up the literature you teach and include more than the canon in your classroom. In addition to traditional classic literature, it's crucial for teachers to include contemporary, high-interest novels in the classroom. By doing so, you will provide your class with new ideas and thought processes are still found in the older classics, but might be more attainable for the modern reader through these young adult pieces of fiction. Merely being in high school involves finding one’s identity and finding where you belong so these young adult texts will focus on these themes as valuable lessons for your students to learn. Here are six contemporary young adult novels to teach and some classic novels you can read with them: 1. The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak This book is one of my favorites. It takes a different look at the horrors of World War II. The story is told from Death's point-of-view, and this book does not shy away from much. Your students will not be able to put the book down, and you will be able to teach them about humanity and the importance of words and books throughout the entirety of the novel. A classic book you can teach alongside The Book Thief is The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank or Night by Elie Wiesel. Both deal with the horrific events of the Holocaust and World War II and it might be interesting for students to see a real first-hand account, after reading a fictional story, with a lot of truth within it. 2. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson The very first time I read this novel, it captivated me. This book is an essential young adult novel to share with your class because it covers a lot of critical issues that are relevant for high schoolers. The novel is told in first-person, so students can relate to the main character and her struggles with PTSD after being sexually assaulted. Laurie Halse Anderson also weaves themes of identity and being an outsider throughout the novel. A classic novel to teach with Speak is The Scarlet Letter by Nathanial Hawthorne. Halse Anderson includes multiple references to the novel within Speak, and the overall theme of being an outsider is found in both. Melinda’s silence is almost identical to the scarlet “A” Hester must wear. It shows how the times have not entirely changed if the same things happen nearly 150 years later. 3. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood While not exactly a young adult novel, this book is currently pretty engaged in our pop culture because of the new television series on Hulu. It is a dystopian novel that, to a degree, shares some similarities with the country today. A common theme throughout is that of identity, and lack of identity. The violation of human rights, especially that of the women, is another theme to point out to your students. A classic novel to pair in your classroom while teaching The Handmaid’s Tale is Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. Both are dystopian novels, showing the future of America and what that means for the people within the country. 4. Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky This book is the epitome of high school life in a semi-current manner. There are a lot of lessons to learn from this story, and students may find themselves relating to a character in the text, which is precisely what you want from reading a book written within the last twenty or so years. It is an excellent coming of age novel, dealing with all kinds of issues your class can analyze. A classic book to teach alongside Perks of Being a Wallflower is The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger. This novel is another coming of age novel, focused on a teenage boy who happens to be quite eloquent, but a bit of an outsider. Students can find similarities and differences as you read these two novels in class. 5. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J. K. Rowling Now you may be hesitant to teach this story due to its popularity, but it is an excellent example of modern literature that students can learn a lot from. If you choose to teach this novel in class, you'll want to focus more on literary criticism and critique because so many of your students might already be familiar with the plot. Rowling takes a lot of inspiration from the British novels of the 19th century and adds in a lot of elements of her own. Students will enjoy reading in-depth something so prominent in their pop culture and something different, more fantastical, than what they may typically read in class. A classic book to teach with Harry Potter is Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. As mentioned earlier, Rowling borrowed some ideas from 19th-century novelists, and a clear example is Jane Eyre. Jane struggles with identity as much as Harry does, and both grew up with a horrible aunt and uncle, where their only wish was to be free of them and the freedom to be themselves. 6. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas This is a relatively new young adult novel, published in 2017, and it heavily focuses on the on-going racial issues America's young Black population faces today. It is also being adapted into a movie, showing how important the story is to this generation. With, again, a theme of identity coming into question, with Starr having to code-switch between her two worlds, and the strength the character must find within herself, the story is an excellent example of what a relevant and impactful contemporary young adult novel looks like. This novel also helps open to the class up to a discussion about the social injustices that people in our country face. A classic novel to teach alongside The Hate U Give is To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. The issues of racism in America within this classic novel and the more contemporary one can be analyzed by your class to see the differences and similarities. Join my email list! Subscribe to receive updates from The Daring English Teacher. Thank you for subscribing! You will soon receive updates, freebies, and teaching ideas. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again. Email Address Please sign me up Subscribe You will not receive spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit This post includes affiliate links.

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Middle School Posters for Classrooms | ... Finisher Ideas for the Middle School ELA Classroom -- FREE poster set

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As a teacher, I am always on the hunt for the perfect tools at the cheapest prices for my ELA classroom. Taking care of our students and keeping our learning centers stocked is just ingrained in our brain.

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