Seed Catalogs: Carrie Lippincott

Collection by Andersen Horticultural Library

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Carrie Lippincott was one of three Minneapolis-based seedswomen at the end of the 19th Century. She began selling seeds in 1891 and called herself “The Pioneer Seedswoman of America.” Her seed business first opened at 319 & 323 Sixth St. S., Minneapolis. Unique among seed companies, she sold only flower seeds, not vegetables, and catered to a female clientele. Andersen Horticultural Library houses a small collection of Carrie Lippincott catalogs.

Andersen Horticultural Library
A bouquet of pansies burst through a mailing envelope on the 1910 Carrie Lippincott catalog cover. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

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A bouquet of pansies burst through a mailing envelope on the 1910 Carrie Lippincott catalog cover. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

Flowers burst through a white mailing envelope on the back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1910 catalog.  Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

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Flowers burst through a white mailing envelope on the back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1910 catalog. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

A large Pink Comet aster fills the back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1911 catalog.  Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

Media Archive

A large Pink Comet aster fills the back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1911 catalog. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

"Little-Blue-Riding-Hood"  and sweetpeas are pictured on Carrie Lippincott's 1908 catalog cover. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers, often featuring children, her business was aimed at women customers.

Media Archive

"Little-Blue-Riding-Hood" and sweetpeas are pictured on Carrie Lippincott's 1908 catalog cover. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers, often featuring children, her business was aimed at women customers.

A beautiful pink rose in full bloom and one in bud fill the back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1909 catalog.  Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

Media Archive

A beautiful pink rose in full bloom and one in bud fill the back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1909 catalog. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

Royal Show pansies, a sunrise, and the phrase "pansies for thought" illustrate the 1895 Carrie Lippincott catalog cover. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers her business was aimed at women customers.

Media Archive

Royal Show pansies, a sunrise, and the phrase "pansies for thought" illustrate the 1895 Carrie Lippincott catalog cover. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers her business was aimed at women customers.

A sweet young girl wears a "flower crown" of nasturtium on the cover of the  1906 Carrie Lippincott catalog. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers her business was aimed at women customers.

Media Archive

A sweet young girl wears a "flower crown" of nasturtium on the cover of the 1906 Carrie Lippincott catalog. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers her business was aimed at women customers.

A young girl surrounded by red and white flowers is pictured on the Carrie Lippincott 1905 catalog cover.  Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers, her business was aimed at women customers.

Media Archive

A young girl surrounded by red and white flowers is pictured on the Carrie Lippincott 1905 catalog cover. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers, her business was aimed at women customers.

The back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1905 catalog features carnations and a banner with Miss Carrie H. Lippincott's initials and the date.  Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers her business was aimed at women customers.

Media Archive

The back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1905 catalog features carnations and a banner with Miss Carrie H. Lippincott's initials and the date. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers her business was aimed at women customers.

Carrie Lippincott's 1911 catalog cover frames a toddler's photograph with sweetpeas.  Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

Media Archive

Carrie Lippincott's 1911 catalog cover frames a toddler's photograph with sweetpeas. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

A young girl admires a Crimson Queen Giant petunia on the 1898 Carrie Lippincott catalog cover. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. She cultivated women customers by sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers during her early years of business.

Media Archive

A young girl admires a Crimson Queen Giant petunia on the 1898 Carrie Lippincott catalog cover. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. She cultivated women customers by sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers during her early years of business.

A deep-colored ruffled Grandiflora Petunia is pictured on the back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1906 catalog.  Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. She cultivated women customers by sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers during her early years of business.  The covers often featured children.

Media Archive

A deep-colored ruffled Grandiflora Petunia is pictured on the back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1906 catalog. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. She cultivated women customers by sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers during her early years of business. The covers often featured children.

The 1909 Lippincott catalog was the first year the catalog departed from its previous 5 inch by 7 inch format.  Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

Media Archive

The 1909 Lippincott catalog was the first year the catalog departed from its previous 5 inch by 7 inch format. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891.

A young girl holds New Comet asters on the cover of the Carrie Lippincott 1900 catalog.  Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. She cultivated women customers by sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers during her early years of business.

Media Archive

A young girl holds New Comet asters on the cover of the Carrie Lippincott 1900 catalog. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. She cultivated women customers by sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers during her early years of business.

Beautifully-gowned women and a lovely New Climbing Nasturtium grace the back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1898 catalog. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. She cultivated women customers by sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers during her early years of business.

Media Archive

Beautifully-gowned women and a lovely New Climbing Nasturtium grace the back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1898 catalog. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. She cultivated women customers by sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers during her early years of business.

The back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1908 catalog shows a banner with her initials and an abundance of asters. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers, her business was aimed at women customers.

Media Archive

The back cover of Carrie Lippincott's 1908 catalog shows a banner with her initials and an abundance of asters. Carrie Lippincott, the self-proclaimed "pioneer seedswoman" and "first woman in the flower seed industry" established her mail-order flower seed business in Minneapolis in 1891. Sending out smaller 5 inch by 7 inch catalogs with colorful covers, her business was aimed at women customers.