Medieval manuscripts

Collection by John Flattun

59 
Pins
John Flattun
Week 3
Week 4
Week 5
Week 6
Week 7
Week 1
Week 2
Other Pins

Week 3

(from week 2) A bronze stylus from the Classical or Hellenistic period of the 4th–1st century B.C. Used to write on wax tablets. Licensed with a CC0 1.0, public domain. W3: Just like the stylus was used for writing on wax tabled, the brush and quill were used for writing on either papyrus or parchment. The nib was slit through which the ink could flow.

Bronze stylus | Cypriot | Classical or Hellenistic | The Met

(from week 2) A bronze stylus from the Classical or Hellenistic period of the 4th–1st century B.C. Used to write on wax tablets. Licensed with a CC0 1.0, public domain. W3: Just like the stylus was used for writing on wax tabled, the brush and quill were used for writing on either papyrus or parchment. The nib was slit through which the ink could flow.

The use of ferrogallic ink, or gallic iron ink, has resulted in huge damage on medieval manuscripts because of the acid added in the production of the ink. Licensed under CC-By.

Words will eat themselves

There is something romantic and tragic about iron gall ink. It has allowed the most beautiful words to take form. The best and the worst words. Dull and incidental household inventories; execution warrants for kings; orders for wars; scientific discoveries; declarations of love. And some of the most incredible poems,...

This uncut quaternios show the imposition of text before it is folded. Reusable with CC BY-SA 4.0 license.

Printed waste endpaper in inside front cover, STC 25004 c.2.

General Description: Decorative roll binding.

(MSS_Urb.lat.2 1v) The most precious metallic pigment was gold. This was hammered into thin sheets, then ground to a powder and added salt, honey, nitro or mercury to prevent it from lumping. Copyright Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana

(MSS_Urb.lat.2 1v) The most precious metallic pigment was gold. This was hammered into thin sheets, then ground to a powder and added salt, honey, nitro or mercury to prevent it from lumping. Copyright Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana

A scribe would often use his penknife to hold down the leaf in place when writing with a quill as not to smear the ink. In public domain.

E03__7720014553_00_0027

A scribe would often use his penknife to hold down the leaf in place when writing with a quill as not to smear the ink. In public domain.

(from week2) A small flee bite on the animal will become a scar in the manuscript during the process of stretching and drying. During this part of the process, the small fissure will develop its characteristic oval shape. Reusability of the image is possible with a copyright from the British library. W3: An extra leaf added by the use of a stub-guard.

The British Library MS Viewer

(from week2) A small flee bite on the animal will become a scar in the manuscript during the process of stretching and drying. During this part of the process, the small fissure will develop its characteristic oval shape. Reusability of the image is possible with a copyright from the British library. W3: An extra leaf added by the use of a stub-guard.

Several quires, consisting of three or four bifolia, stitched together. No information on reuse.

Coptic Book Binding

This past April, I took the Bookbinding Core Certificate Program at the San Francisco Center for the Book, in where I learned how to bind books in four distinct styles: • coptic binding • limp vellum binding (or limp parchment) • flat back hard case binding • classic rounded back cloth or leather binding (with…

(From week2)On the flesh side of parchment made of calves's skin, vein marks from the capillaries can be found. Often a sign of improper blooding. Reusability with CC BY 4 license. W3: Using carbon ink prevents the colour from fading, but might be subject to disappearing if washed as it does not penetrate the parchment.

Scarring, tears, veins and hair: The imperfections of medieval parchment | Rare Books and Manuscripts Library

Throughout November I had the privilege of working with our modest, but very impressive, collection of medieval manuscripts as I prepared for a series of lectures on medieval books and manuscript p…

(from week2)A Roman papyrus leaf in Greek from the end of the 2nd century AD torn on all sides. The reuseability of the image is given with a CC BY 3 license. W:3 Use of pagination, also calle quire signature shifted over time, here in the upper middle, with a different nib than the rest.

(from week2)A Roman papyrus leaf in Greek from the end of the 2nd century AD torn on all sides. The reuseability of the image is given with a CC BY 3 license. W:3 Use of pagination, also calle quire signature shifted over time, here in the upper middle, with a different nib than the rest.

(Royal MS 19 B XV) The colour red was often made by heating together mercury and sulfur in a clay pot until the smoke turned red. Though this method is rather unhealthy. Reusability via the British library by CC0 1.0

The British Library MS Viewer

(Royal MS 19 B XV) The colour red was often made by heating together mercury and sulfur in a clay pot until the smoke turned red. Though this method is rather unhealthy. Reusability via the British library by CC0 1.0

Week 4

(Morgan MS 493) The harmonious composition of the secret canon balanced distribution of spaces, where the harmony between the page and the text area comes from the equal dimensions, since when the surface of departure has a proportion of 4:3 for the double page, the height of the text area has the same measure than the width of the page, and the margins match the continuous proportion 2:3:4:6. No information regarding copyrights, credits belong to Faksimile Verlag Luzern.

Fols. 27v–28r

Book of Hours, Bruges, Belgium, ca. 1480, MS M.493, fols. 27v-28r

(Arundel MS 60, f. 12v) Ruling could be done either by a dry point instrument, shown here, making a blind line, that is, a non-coloured line, that has the shape of a furrow in the page it is performed, and of course a ridge in the other page of the same leaf. Copyright by BL

Details of an item from the British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

This page shows details of an item from the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

(MS Harley 4664) Text lines or lines for writing are the horizontal lines within the text area intended to guide the main writing. The lines for writing that are outside the text area receive the name of independent marginal ruling. Copyright belonging to British Library

Details of an item from the British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

This page shows details of an item from the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

(Yates Thompson MS 17) Pricking holes along the outer bounds of the left margin marks the ruling point for the text lines. Here the holes a made with a rounded tip. Copyright British library

The British Library MS Viewer

(Yates Thompson MS 17) Pricking holes along the outer bounds of the left margin marks the ruling point for the text lines. Here the holes a made with a rounded tip. Copyright British library

(From w2) A Roman papyrus leaf in Greek from the end of the 2nd century AD torn on all sides. The reuseability of the image is given with a CC BY 3 license.   W4: Ruling was not practiced on papyrus, where the horizontal fibers functioned as lines.

(From w2) A Roman papyrus leaf in Greek from the end of the 2nd century AD torn on all sides. The reuseability of the image is given with a CC BY 3 license. W4: Ruling was not practiced on papyrus, where the horizontal fibers functioned as lines.

(From W3)(Royal MS 19 B XV) The colour red was often made by heating together mercury and sulfur in a clay pot until the smoke turned red. Though this method is rather unhealthy. Reusability via the British library by CC0 1.0 W4: The elements that a page is composed of are the text area and the margins, part of the mis-en-page.

The British Library MS Viewer

(From W3)(Royal MS 19 B XV) The colour red was often made by heating together mercury and sulfur in a clay pot until the smoke turned red. Though this method is rather unhealthy. Reusability via the British library by CC0 1.0 W4: The elements that a page is composed of are the text area and the margins, part of the mis-en-page.

(From W3)(MSS_Urb.lat.2 1v) The most precious metallic pigment was gold. This was hammered into thin sheets, then ground to a powder and added salt, honey, nitro or mercury to prevent it from lumping. Copyright Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana W4: The written and decorated parts of a page are called black, while the rest is termed white areas.

(From W3)(MSS_Urb.lat.2 1v) The most precious metallic pigment was gold. This was hammered into thin sheets, then ground to a powder and added salt, honey, nitro or mercury to prevent it from lumping. Copyright Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana W4: The written and decorated parts of a page are called black, while the rest is termed white areas.

(from W3) A scribe would often use his penknife to hold down the leaf in place when writing with a quill as not to smear the ink. In public domain. W4: The text area of a page could consist of columns as opposed to full lines, divided by a space called the intercolumn.

E03__7720014553_00_0027

(from W3) A scribe would often use his penknife to hold down the leaf in place when writing with a quill as not to smear the ink. In public domain. W4: The text area of a page could consist of columns as opposed to full lines, divided by a space called the intercolumn.

(From W2)On the flesh side of parchment made of calves's skin, vein marks from the capillaries can be found. Often a sign of improper blooding. Reusability with CC BY 4 license. W4: The lines framing the text area are called bounding lines, marking the left, right, top and bottom, determining the length of writing and justification.

Scarring, tears, veins and hair: The imperfections of medieval parchment | Rare Books and Manuscripts Library

Throughout November I had the privilege of working with our modest, but very impressive, collection of medieval manuscripts as I prepared for a series of lectures on medieval books and manuscript p…

Week 5

(Royal MS 1 D VIII) Another scribal error we find is the omitting of words or phrases, called homoioteleuton or saut du meme au meme. Public domain

The British Library MS Viewer

(Royal MS 1 D VIII) Another scribal error we find is the omitting of words or phrases, called homoioteleuton or saut du meme au meme. Public domain

(MSS_Vat.gr.1209) A typical scribal error was to copy the same word twice, this is called dittography. In this example, the phrase "Great is Artemis of the Ephesians" is repeated. Copyrights by the Vatican Library.

DigiVatLib

(MSS_Vat.gr.1209) A typical scribal error was to copy the same word twice, this is called dittography. In this example, the phrase "Great is Artemis of the Ephesians" is repeated. Copyrights by the Vatican Library.

(Bibliothèque Municipale de Lyon, MS 0483) This manuscript from the 5th or 6th Century is an example of Half-Uncial script. Copyright: Bibliothèque municipale de Lyon

Notice brève : Manuscrit contenant le commentaire d’Origène In epistulam Pauli ad Romanos, livres I-V et un fragment du livre I. Écrit au Ve – VIe siècle. D’origine italienne, présence à Lyon ancienne. Folio : 9R

(Bibliothèque Municipale de Lyon, MS 0483) This manuscript from the 5th or 6th Century is an example of Half-Uncial script. Copyright: Bibliothèque municipale de Lyon

(MS. Hatton 48) The uncial script, found here in the Rule of St Benedict, was a majoscule script, typical from the early medieval period of the 8th Century. Copyrights belong to Bodleian.

(MS. Hatton 48) The uncial script, found here in the Rule of St Benedict, was a majoscule script, typical from the early medieval period of the 8th Century. Copyrights belong to Bodleian.

(Cotton MS Nero D IV) An example of insular script developed on the British isles from the Half-Uncial script. Copyrights belonging to British Library.

The British Library MS Viewer

(Cotton MS Nero D IV) An example of insular script developed on the British isles from the Half-Uncial script. Copyrights belonging to British Library.

(Yates Thompson MS 17) W4: Pricking holes along the outer bounds of the left margin marks the ruling point for the text lines. Here the holes a made with a rounded tip. Copyright British library W5: The protogothic script was the transition between Carolingian and Gothic script, with a more angular form.

The British Library MS Viewer

(Yates Thompson MS 17) W4: Pricking holes along the outer bounds of the left margin marks the ruling point for the text lines. Here the holes a made with a rounded tip. Copyright British library W5: The protogothic script was the transition between Carolingian and Gothic script, with a more angular form.

(Morgan MS 493) W4: The harmonious composition of the secret canon balanced distribution of spaces, where the harmony between the page and the text area comes from the equal dimensions, since when the surface of departure has a proportion of 4:3 for the double page, the height of text area is same as the width, the margins match the continuous proportion 2:3:4:6. Credits: Faksimile Verlag Luzern. W5: The Gothic script with its angular form was dominant in Europe from the late 12th Century.

Fols. 27v–28r

Book of Hours, Bruges, Belgium, ca. 1480, MS M.493, fols. 27v-28r

(MS Harley 4664) W4: Text lines or lines for writing are the horizontal lines within the text area intended to guide the main writing. The lines for writing that are outside the text area receive the name of independent marginal ruling. Copyright belonging to British Library W5: The different scribes who wrote a manuscripts where either identified by name, or by the term "Hun", i.e. Hunt A, Hunt B etc.

Details of an item from the British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

This page shows details of an item from the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

(CRAI. Ms. 762) W3: A scribe would often use his penknife to hold down the leaf in place when writing with a quill as not to smear the ink. In public domain. W5: The script Praegothica, what we normally call Gothic, can be subdivided into textualis septentrionalis, or textualis meridionalis, or textualis. Semitextualis, cursivae antiquiores, cursivae recentiores, hybridae, and gothico antiqua.

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(CRAI. Ms. 762) W3: A scribe would often use his penknife to hold down the leaf in place when writing with a quill as not to smear the ink. In public domain. W5: The script Praegothica, what we normally call Gothic, can be subdivided into textualis septentrionalis, or textualis meridionalis, or textualis. Semitextualis, cursivae antiquiores, cursivae recentiores, hybridae, and gothico antiqua.

(MSS_Urb.lat.2 1v) W3: The most precious metallic pigment was gold. This was hammered into thin sheets, then ground to a powder and added salt, honey, nitro or mercury to prevent it from lumping. Copyright Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana W5: Even though the letters on this page are all capitals, the rest of the manuscript is written in humanist minuscules.

(MSS_Urb.lat.2 1v) W3: The most precious metallic pigment was gold. This was hammered into thin sheets, then ground to a powder and added salt, honey, nitro or mercury to prevent it from lumping. Copyright Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana W5: Even though the letters on this page are all capitals, the rest of the manuscript is written in humanist minuscules.

Week 6

(Ms 107, fol 89r, Verdun, CC Bibliothèque de Verdun) W6: The bas-de-page, an unframed image that occurs in the lower margin, often contained humorous elements.

(Ms 107, fol 89r, Verdun, CC Bibliothèque de Verdun) W6: The bas-de-page, an unframed image that occurs in the lower margin, often contained humorous elements.

W6: (BL. Royal 1 B XI   f. 6, CC British library) In this figured initial, showing the archangel Michael slaying the dragon, also illustrate an unfinished initial. The rubricator has coloured the opening word with red and blue, but the remaining colouring of the initial remain.

Image of an item from the British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

This page describes and shows an image of an item in the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

(Beinecke MS 408, Voynich Manuscript, Copyright Beinecke Library) W6: The marginal decorations in parts of the Voynich manuscript show the new form of realism in floral representation from rinceau to realism.

(Beinecke MS 408, Voynich Manuscript, Copyright Beinecke Library) W6: The marginal decorations in parts of the Voynich manuscript show the new form of realism in floral representation from rinceau to realism.

W6: (BL. Cotton Nero D IV, public domain) This full panel illumination from a Anglo-Saxon gospel-book, "The Lindisfarne Gospels", shows an example of a Celtic carpet page decoration. A typical feature from early insular art of 8th century.

The British Library MS Viewer

W6: (BL. Cotton Nero D IV, public domain) This full panel illumination from a Anglo-Saxon gospel-book, "The Lindisfarne Gospels", shows an example of a Celtic carpet page decoration. A typical feature from early insular art of 8th century.

W6: (Morgan Library, MS G.37, fol. 1r, copyrights belong to the library) In the full panel illumination of the Tree of Consanguinity we can see a rare example of the illustrator. At the bottom of the tree, two figures hold a banner with the text: "Gautier Lebaube made this tree", the word "fecit" (made) was usually used by illuminator as "scripsit" was used by scribes.

Two miniatures, possibly from a decretals, MS G.37 fol. 1r - Images from Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts

Two miniatures, possibly from a decretals, France, probably Paris, 1230-1260

(MS Harley 4664) Text lines or lines for writing are the horizontal lines within the text area intended to guide the main writing. The lines for writing that are outside the text area receive the name of independent marginal ruling. Copyright belonging to British Library W6: The hierarchical structure of the different initials in a manuscript can be seen here, ranking from the floriate initial, to the inhabited initials, and the rubricated paragraph initials.

Details of an item from the British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

This page shows details of an item from the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

(Arundel MS 60, f. 12v) Ruling could be done either by a dry point instrument, shown here, making a blind line, that is, a non-coloured line, that has the shape of a furrow in the page it is performed, and of course a ridge in the other page of the same leaf. Copyright by BL W6: This is an example of a panel illustration, covering a complete page in the manuscript.

Details of an item from the British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

This page shows details of an item from the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

(Royal MS 19 B XV) The colour red was often made by heating together mercury and sulfur in a clay pot until the smoke turned red. Though this method is rather unhealthy. Reusability via the British library by CC0 1.0 W6: In the text below the illuminated panel of this page, taking up more than half the page, we find two examples of plain flourish initials.

The British Library MS Viewer

(Royal MS 19 B XV) The colour red was often made by heating together mercury and sulfur in a clay pot until the smoke turned red. Though this method is rather unhealthy. Reusability via the British library by CC0 1.0 W6: In the text below the illuminated panel of this page, taking up more than half the page, we find two examples of plain flourish initials.

A scribe would often use his penknife to hold down the leaf in place when writing with a quill as not to smear the ink. In public domain. W6: In this initial illustration, we have an example of a historiated initial, a portrait of the author as chronicler of his work.

E03__7720014553_00_0027

A scribe would often use his penknife to hold down the leaf in place when writing with a quill as not to smear the ink. In public domain. W6: In this initial illustration, we have an example of a historiated initial, a portrait of the author as chronicler of his work.

(MSS_Urb.lat.2 1v) The most precious metallic pigment was gold. This was hammered into thin sheets, then ground to a powder and added salt, honey, nitro or mercury to prevent it from lumping. Copyright Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana W6: This complete marginal decoration is the utmost example of the fullest style of marginal pattern, where all sides are covered in decoration of different styles.

(MSS_Urb.lat.2 1v) The most precious metallic pigment was gold. This was hammered into thin sheets, then ground to a powder and added salt, honey, nitro or mercury to prevent it from lumping. Copyright Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana W6: This complete marginal decoration is the utmost example of the fullest style of marginal pattern, where all sides are covered in decoration of different styles.

Week 7

W7 (3406e32, BL, public domain) The main feature, and difference from the more modern 19 Century binding, of the typical Gothic rounded spine was that the spine followed the natural form of the quiers. This resulted in that the manuscript would fully open when laid flat.

Database of Bookbindings - LargeImage

The site provides an online source of information and a finding aid to bookbindings in the British Library. Images and searchable text relating to selected bindings continue to be added.

W7 (PA6809.A5 D47 1552, copyright Princeton U.) In this French manuscript from the 16th century we see an example of the decorative technique called gauffered edges. Gauffered edges are first gilded and then further decorated by impressing finishing tools into the textblock edge surface.

Magnifier

W7 (PA6809.A5 D47 1552, copyright Princeton U.) In this French manuscript from the 16th century we see an example of the decorative technique called gauffered edges. Gauffered edges are first gilded and then further decorated by impressing finishing tools into the textblock edge surface.

W7: (Smithsonian, no information on copyrights) Here we see examples of the herringbone sewing technique, and a detail of the endband. The herringbone style of sewing was the first example of bookbinding sewing on supports.

The Fix: Hidden Manuscripts – Smithsonian Libraries / Unbound

W7: (Smithsonian, no information on copyrights) Here we see examples of the herringbone sewing technique, and a detail of the endband. The herringbone style of sewing was the first example of bookbinding sewing on supports.

W7 (Davis80, CC by BL) A typical undecorated English Romanesque binding. Note the brass clasp.

Database of Bookbindings - LargeImage

The site provides an online source of information and a finding aid to bookbindings in the British Library. Images and searchable text relating to selected bindings continue to be added.

W7: Rebinding a manuscript (Fitzwilliam MS 251) using a sewing frame. The use of a sewing frame has been in use since the 12th century. Public domain.

Sewing | The Fitzwilliam Museum

The manuscript was resewn to the original marking up on double linen cord supports, and with thinner single cord supports for the kettle stitches (the point at which the thread leaves one quire and is taken to the next).

W7: (Historical Binding: A Carolingian Cutaway Model) In this reconstrunction we see the method of using wooden boards with holes and lines for the sewing.

Historical Binding: A Carolingian Cutaway Model

W7: (Historical Binding: A Carolingian Cutaway Model) In this reconstrunction we see the method of using wooden boards with holes and lines for the sewing.

W7: (Add MS 28821/1, public domain, BL) Typically, the best moment to explore the inner workings of medieval bookbinding is during restoration, when the binding is removed and the details are revealed. Here we see  link-stitch chains remain in the spine area from a Byzantine manuscript.

Byzantine bookbinding

The original binding of Additional 28821, a volume containing Byzantine musical texts, is now kept separately, having detached from the original manuscript at some point in the 20th century.

W7: (Arundel MS 66, CC BL), A sad fact about medieval bookbinding is that very few original bindings still remain intact. As the binding's main function was to protect the content, it was also the first to suffer damage, resulting in significant repairs, or as shown here, a complete rebinding.

The British Library MS Viewer

W7: (Arundel MS 66, CC BL), A sad fact about medieval bookbinding is that very few original bindings still remain intact. As the binding's main function was to protect the content, it was also the first to suffer damage, resulting in significant repairs, or as shown here, a complete rebinding.

W7 (Add MS 89000, CC British Library) The St Cuthbert Gospel from the 8th Century, is a fine example of the cuir ciselé. This technique of decorating the leather by means of a sharp instrument.

Digitised Manuscripts

W7 (Add MS 89000, CC British Library) The St Cuthbert Gospel from the 8th Century, is a fine example of the cuir ciselé. This technique of decorating the leather by means of a sharp instrument.

Several quires, consisting of three or four bifolia, stitched together. No information on reuse. W7: Typical of the Coptic binding is the sowing with linked stitches.

Coptic Book Binding

This past April, I took the Bookbinding Core Certificate Program at the San Francisco Center for the Book, in where I learned how to bind books in four distinct styles: • coptic binding • limp vellum binding (or limp parchment) • flat back hard case binding • classic rounded back cloth or leather binding (with…

Week 1

CONTENTdm

Hieronimus Pergamentcodex. "Ieronymi commentariorum super Mathæum liber".

Skrevet av diakonen Ulbaldus Ao. 1200. Skrevet paa pergament med illuminerte initialer. Udmerket vedlikeholdt. Paa første blad staar: "In hoc volumine continentur hec opuscula sancti iheronimi prebyteri super mathæum libri quatuor super Marcum liber unus super epistolam ad philemonem liber unus super epistolam ad galathas libri tres super epistolam ad ephesios libri tres super epistolam…

Fitzwilliam Museum Collections Explorer - Object Marlay cutting G. 3a (Id:170665)

Image of an item from the British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

This page describes and shows an image of an item in the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

Medieval Manuscripts in Oxford Libraries

A catalogue of Western manuscripts at the Bodleian Libraries and selected Oxford colleges

Week 2

A bronze stylus from the Classical or Hellenistic period of the 4th–1st century B.C. Used to write on wax tablets. Licensed with a CC0 1.0, public domain.

Bronze stylus | Cypriot | Classical or Hellenistic | The Met

A bronze stylus from the Classical or Hellenistic period of the 4th–1st century B.C. Used to write on wax tablets. Licensed with a CC0 1.0, public domain.

A small flee bite on the animal will become a scar in the manuscript during the process of stretching and drying. During this part of the process, the small fissure will develop its characteristic oval shape. Reusability of the image is possible with a copyright from the British library.

The British Library MS Viewer

A small flee bite on the animal will become a scar in the manuscript during the process of stretching and drying. During this part of the process, the small fissure will develop its characteristic oval shape. Reusability of the image is possible with a copyright from the British library.

On the flesh side of parchment made of calves's skin, vein marks from the capillaries can be found. Often a sign of improper blooding. Reusability with CC BY 4 license.

Scarring, tears, veins and hair: The imperfections of medieval parchment | Rare Books and Manuscripts Library

Throughout November I had the privilege of working with our modest, but very impressive, collection of medieval manuscripts as I prepared for a series of lectures on medieval books and manuscript p…

A Roman papyrus leaf in Greek from the end of the 2nd century AD torn on all sides. The reuseability of the image is given with a CC BY 3 license.

A Roman papyrus leaf in Greek from the end of the 2nd century AD torn on all sides. The reuseability of the image is given with a CC BY 3 license.

Leaves from a wooden writing tablet from the Roman era made in Egypt, combining wood and wax with a rigid frame codex. The image is available with a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license.

Image gallery: writing-tablet

Full: Front Leaf from a wooden writing tablet.

Other Pins

W7 (3406e32, BL, public domain) The main feature, and difference from the more modern 19 Century binding, of the typical Gothic rounded spine was that the spine followed the natural form of the quiers. This resulted in that the manuscript would fully open when laid flat.

Database of Bookbindings - LargeImage

The site provides an online source of information and a finding aid to bookbindings in the British Library. Images and searchable text relating to selected bindings continue to be added.

W7 (PA6809.A5 D47 1552, copyright Princeton U.) In this French manuscript from the 16th century we see an example of the decorative technique called gauffered edges. Gauffered edges are first gilded and then further decorated by impressing finishing tools into the textblock edge surface.

Magnifier

W7 (PA6809.A5 D47 1552, copyright Princeton U.) In this French manuscript from the 16th century we see an example of the decorative technique called gauffered edges. Gauffered edges are first gilded and then further decorated by impressing finishing tools into the textblock edge surface.

W7: (Smithsonian, no information on copyrights) Here we see examples of the herringbone sewing technique, and a detail of the endband. The herringbone style of sewing was the first example of bookbinding sewing on supports.

The Fix: Hidden Manuscripts – Smithsonian Libraries / Unbound

W7: (Smithsonian, no information on copyrights) Here we see examples of the herringbone sewing technique, and a detail of the endband. The herringbone style of sewing was the first example of bookbinding sewing on supports.

W7 (Davis80, CC by BL) A typical undecorated English Romanesque binding. Note the brass clasp.

Database of Bookbindings - LargeImage

The site provides an online source of information and a finding aid to bookbindings in the British Library. Images and searchable text relating to selected bindings continue to be added.

W7: Rebinding a manuscript (Fitzwilliam MS 251) using a sewing frame. The use of a sewing frame has been in use since the 12th century. Public domain.

Sewing | The Fitzwilliam Museum

The manuscript was resewn to the original marking up on double linen cord supports, and with thinner single cord supports for the kettle stitches (the point at which the thread leaves one quire and is taken to the next).

W7: (Historical Binding: A Carolingian Cutaway Model) In this reconstrunction we see the method of using wooden boards with holes and lines for the sewing.

Historical Binding: A Carolingian Cutaway Model

W7: (Historical Binding: A Carolingian Cutaway Model) In this reconstrunction we see the method of using wooden boards with holes and lines for the sewing.

W7: (Add MS 28821/1, public domain, BL) Typically, the best moment to explore the inner workings of medieval bookbinding is during restoration, when the binding is removed and the details are revealed. Here we see  link-stitch chains remain in the spine area from a Byzantine manuscript.

Byzantine bookbinding

The original binding of Additional 28821, a volume containing Byzantine musical texts, is now kept separately, having detached from the original manuscript at some point in the 20th century.

W7: (Arundel MS 66, CC BL), A sad fact about medieval bookbinding is that very few original bindings still remain intact. As the binding's main function was to protect the content, it was also the first to suffer damage, resulting in significant repairs, or as shown here, a complete rebinding.

The British Library MS Viewer

W7: (Arundel MS 66, CC BL), A sad fact about medieval bookbinding is that very few original bindings still remain intact. As the binding's main function was to protect the content, it was also the first to suffer damage, resulting in significant repairs, or as shown here, a complete rebinding.

W7 (Add MS 89000, CC British Library) The St Cuthbert Gospel from the 8th Century, is a fine example of the cuir ciselé. This technique of decorating the leather by means of a sharp instrument.

Digitised Manuscripts

W7 (Add MS 89000, CC British Library) The St Cuthbert Gospel from the 8th Century, is a fine example of the cuir ciselé. This technique of decorating the leather by means of a sharp instrument.

Several quires, consisting of three or four bifolia, stitched together. No information on reuse. W7: Typical of the Coptic binding is the sowing with linked stitches.

Coptic Book Binding

This past April, I took the Bookbinding Core Certificate Program at the San Francisco Center for the Book, in where I learned how to bind books in four distinct styles: • coptic binding • limp vellum binding (or limp parchment) • flat back hard case binding • classic rounded back cloth or leather binding (with…

(Ms 107, fol 89r, Verdun, CC Bibliothèque de Verdun) W6: The bas-de-page, an unframed image that occurs in the lower margin, often contained humorous elements.

(Ms 107, fol 89r, Verdun, CC Bibliothèque de Verdun) W6: The bas-de-page, an unframed image that occurs in the lower margin, often contained humorous elements.

W6: (BL. Royal 1 B XI   f. 6, CC British library) In this figured initial, showing the archangel Michael slaying the dragon, also illustrate an unfinished initial. The rubricator has coloured the opening word with red and blue, but the remaining colouring of the initial remain.

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(Beinecke MS 408, Voynich Manuscript, Copyright Beinecke Library) W6: The marginal decorations in parts of the Voynich manuscript show the new form of realism in floral representation from rinceau to realism.

(Beinecke MS 408, Voynich Manuscript, Copyright Beinecke Library) W6: The marginal decorations in parts of the Voynich manuscript show the new form of realism in floral representation from rinceau to realism.

W6: (BL. Cotton Nero D IV, public domain) This full panel illumination from a Anglo-Saxon gospel-book, "The Lindisfarne Gospels", shows an example of a Celtic carpet page decoration. A typical feature from early insular art of 8th century.

The British Library MS Viewer

W6: (BL. Cotton Nero D IV, public domain) This full panel illumination from a Anglo-Saxon gospel-book, "The Lindisfarne Gospels", shows an example of a Celtic carpet page decoration. A typical feature from early insular art of 8th century.

W6: (Morgan Library, MS G.37, fol. 1r, copyrights belong to the library) In the full panel illumination of the Tree of Consanguinity we can see a rare example of the illustrator. At the bottom of the tree, two figures hold a banner with the text: "Gautier Lebaube made this tree", the word "fecit" (made) was usually used by illuminator as "scripsit" was used by scribes.

Two miniatures, possibly from a decretals, MS G.37 fol. 1r - Images from Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts

Two miniatures, possibly from a decretals, France, probably Paris, 1230-1260

(MS Harley 4664) Text lines or lines for writing are the horizontal lines within the text area intended to guide the main writing. The lines for writing that are outside the text area receive the name of independent marginal ruling. Copyright belonging to British Library W6: The hierarchical structure of the different initials in a manuscript can be seen here, ranking from the floriate initial, to the inhabited initials, and the rubricated paragraph initials.

Details of an item from the British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

This page shows details of an item from the Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

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