How the Manx language came back from the dead | 2 April 2015

How the Manx language came back from the dead

Path to the White Fishermans Cottage on a coast - Niarbyl on the Isle of Man Stock Photo - 13100158

Henry Jenner, The Manx Language, Its Grammar, Literature and Present State, Transactions of the Philological Society, 16 (1875-6, 1877), pp. 172-197.

Henry Jenner - The Manx Language, 1875

A Short History of the Manx Language by Diarmuid O. Breaslain http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1900286025/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_IWk3wb1AAZ2H8

A Short History of the Manx Language by Diarmuid O. Breaslain http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1900286025/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_IWk3wb1AAZ2H8

Idioma manés.png    Manx (Manks) language of Isle of Man

png Manx (Manks) language of Isle of Man

Outline of Manx Language and Literature by Robert Leith Thomson http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1870029046/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_SIIOwb1EPTSZ6

Outline of Manx Language and Literature by Robert Leith Thomson http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1870029046/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_SIIOwb1EPTSZ6

Manx (Gaelg/Gailck) is a Celtic language spoken on the Isle of Man (Ellan Vannin). It is closely related to the Irish of Ulster and Scottish Gaelic of Galloway and was brought to the Isle of Man by settlers from those areas during the 5th century AD. Manx began to emerge as a distinct language in the 13th-14th century after the collapse of the Norse kingdom of Mann and the Isles and prior to the long period of English control through the Stanleys. (...)

Information about Manx, a Celtic language spoken in the Isle of Man that was revived during the century.

Geographic distribution of the Gaelic languages...Ireland, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Isle of Man, UK

Geographic Distribution of the Gaelic Languages [1090x1542]

Geographic Distribution of the Gaelic Languages bleacliath: A brief history of the Gaelic languages: Middle Irish spread into Scotland and the Isle of Man about 1000 years ago and has since developed into Scottish Gaelic, Manx and Modern Irish

Ned Maddrell (1877-1974) was the last surviving speaker of the Manx language of the Isle of Man.

This is audio recorded from the 1964 by Brian Stowell of the last native Manx Gaelic speaker, Ned Maddrell. Ned was born in 1877 and died at in 1974 at the a.

Learning a language in later life: are you ever too old? | Education | The Guardian

Learning a language in later life: are you ever too old?

Outline of Manx language and literature by Pilgrim A.J. Thomson R.L. http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B007QJPSH8/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_AHIOwb03DP0VR

Outline of Manx language and literature

Learn Manx.  Dedicated to the Gaelic language of The Isle of Man.  Learn Manx is a free App for iPhone, iPad and Android phones and website: www.learnmanx.com. These pages support learners of the language. https://www.facebook.com/LearnManx?ref=profile

Learn Manx. Dedicated to the Gaelic language of The Isle of Man. Learn Manx is a free App for iPhone, iPad and Android phones and website: www.learnmanx.com. These pages support learners of the language. https://www.facebook.com/LearnManx?ref=profile

Manx National Anthem... it falls into the imported Christian mythology pretty fast, but there are nice hints at Manx culture in there. It's also nice to see the Manx language version!

it falls into the imported Christian mythology pretty fast, but there are nice hints at Manx culture in there. It's also nice to see the Manx language version!

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