Globular Cluster  Credit: NASA, ESA and H. Richer (University of British Columbia

Globular Cluster Credit: NASA, ESA and H. Richer (University of British Columbia

Hubble Sees an Ancient Globular Cluster This image captures the stunning NGC 6535, a globular cluster 22,000 light-years away in the constellation of Serpens (The Serpent) that measures one light-year across.

Hubble Sees an Ancient Globular Cluster

Globular star cluster Messier 9 (M9) has over 300,000 stars within a diameter of about 90 light-years. It is 25,000 light-years from Earth, near the central bulge of our Milky Way galaxy in the constellation of Sagittarius. Imagine the night sky on a planet orbiting one of these stars!

Globular star cluster Messier 9 (M9) has over 300,000 stars within a diameter of about 90 light-years. It is 25,000 light-years from Earth, near the central bulge of our Milky Way galaxy in the constellation of Sagittarius. Imagine the night sky on a planet orbiting one of these stars!

A map of the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way

A map of the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way

n-a-s-a: “  A map of our galaxy the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars ”

n-a-s-a: “ A map of our galaxy the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars ”

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observes the center of the globular cluster Messier 22, also known as M22.

Hubble Stares into the Crammed Center of Messier 22

The Globular Cluster NGC 3201

The Globular Cluster NGC 3201

Hubble Revisits a Globular Cluster’s Age | NASA

Hubble Revisits a Globular Cluster’s Age | NASA

M72: A Globular Cluster of Stars (Aug 19 2012)  Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HPOW  Explanation: Globular clusters once ruled the Milky Way. Back in the old days, back when our Galaxy first formed, perhaps thousands of globular clusters roamed our Galaxy. Today, there are less than 200 left. Many globular clusters were destroyed over the eons by repeated fateful encounters with each other or the Galactic center. #astronomy

M72: A Globular Cluster of Stars (Aug 19 2012) Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HPOW Explanation: Globular clusters once ruled the Milky Way. Back in the old days, back when our Galaxy first formed, perhaps thousands of globular clusters roamed our Galaxy. Today, there are less than 200 left. Many globular clusters were destroyed over the eons by repeated fateful encounters with each other or the Galactic center. #astronomy

n-a-s-a:    A map of our galaxy the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars

n-a-s-a: A map of our galaxy the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars

Hubble's Messier 9 Globular Cluster Photo-shows hundreds of thousands of glittering stars shine in a cluster at the center of our galaxy in a new photograph from the Hubble Space Telescope.

LOOK: Vast Star Cluster Shines In High-Res Hubble Telescope Image

The origin of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) has posed a long-standing mystery for astronomers. New observations of several of these faint giants with the Hubble Space Telescope are now lending support to one theory. The post Globular Clusters for Faint Galaxies appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

The origin of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) has posed a long-standing mystery for astronomers. New observations of several of these faint giants with the Hubble Space Telescope are now lending support to one theory. The post Globular Clusters for Faint Galaxies appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

a coarse sprinkling of stars cut with bright slashes of red and blue against the black velvet of space

a coarse sprinkling of stars cut with bright slashes of red and blue against the black velvet of space

There is nothing to learn... some of us know that... Yes. In us... all the knowledge is available... Everything that has ever happened is present in this moment through vibration... or Frequencies... There is no past... no future... only this present moment... In this moment I can reach in... or out... and connect to all that is.

There is nothing to learn... some of us know that... Yes. In us... all the knowledge is available... Everything that has ever happened is present in this moment through vibration... or Frequencies... There is no past... no future... only this present moment... In this moment I can reach in... or out... and connect to all that is.

This stellar swarm is M80 (NGC 6093), one of the densest of the 147 known globular star clusters in the Milky Way galaxy. Located about 28,000 light-years from Earth, M80 contains hundreds of thousands of stars, all held together by their mutual gravitational attraction. - Courtesy Photo | NASA

This stellar swarm is M80 (NGC 6093), one of the densest of the 147 known globular star clusters in the Milky Way galaxy. Located about 28,000 light-years from Earth, M80 contains hundreds of thousands of stars, all held together by their mutual gravitational attraction. - Courtesy Photo | NASA

The origin of ultra-diffuse galaxies has long been a mystery. New observations of several of these objects with Hubble are lending support to one theory.

The origin of ultra-diffuse galaxies has long been a mystery. New observations of several of these objects with Hubble are lending support to one theory.

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