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The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observes the center of the globular cluster Messier 22, also known as M22.

Hubble Stares into the Crammed Center of Messier 22

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observes the center of the globular cluster Messier 22, also known as M22.

A map of the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way

A map of the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way

Hubble Sees an Ancient Globular Cluster This image captures the stunning NGC 6535, a globular cluster 22,000 light-years away in the constellation of Serpens (The Serpent) that measures one light-year across.

Hubble Sees an Ancient Globular Cluster

Hubble Sees an Ancient Globular Cluster This image captures the stunning NGC 6535, a globular cluster 22,000 light-years away in the constellation of Serpens (The Serpent) that measures one light-year across.

Globular Cluster  Credit: NASA, ESA and H. Richer (University of British Columbia

Globular Cluster Credit: NASA, ESA and H. Richer (University of British Columbia

M22 globular cluster  js

M22 globular cluster js

A selection of the globular cluster Terzan 5, a unique link to the Milky Way's past. Incredibly old stars can be found within globular clusters, relics of some of the first 'bursts' of star formation to occur in our vicinity of the Universe.

A selection of the globular cluster Terzan 5, a unique link to the Milky Way's past. Incredibly old stars can be found within globular clusters, relics of some of the first 'bursts' of star formation to occur in our vicinity of the Universe.

Messier 9 cluster: First discovered by Charles Messier in 1764, the globular cluster Messier 9 is a vast swarm of ancient stars located 25,000 light-years away, close to the center of the galaxy.   The cluster’s innermost stars have never been individually resolved - until now.   Hubble has captured the details of over 250,000 stars within it.  Most of Messier 9′s stars are nearly ten billion years old — twice the Sun’s age.

The Best Science Photos of the Week - March 17, 2012

Messier 9 cluster: First discovered by Charles Messier in 1764, the globular cluster Messier 9 is a vast swarm of ancient stars located 25,000 light-years away, close to the center of the galaxy. The cluster’s innermost stars have never been individually resolved - until now. Hubble has captured the details of over 250,000 stars within it. Most of Messier 9′s stars are nearly ten billion years old — twice the Sun’s age.

Hubble's Messier 9 Globular Cluster Photo-shows hundreds of thousands of glittering stars shine in a cluster at the center of our galaxy in a new photograph from the Hubble Space Telescope.

LOOK: Vast Star Cluster Shines In High-Res Hubble Telescope Image

Hubble's Messier 9 Globular Cluster Photo-shows hundreds of thousands of glittering stars shine in a cluster at the center of our galaxy in a new photograph from the Hubble Space Telescope.

M72: A Globular Cluster of Stars (Aug 19 2012) Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HPOW Explanation: Globular clusters once ruled the Milky Way. Back in the old days, back when our Galaxy first formed, perhaps thousands of globular clusters roamed our Galaxy. Today, there are less than 200 left. Many globular clusters were destroyed over the eons by repeated fateful encounters with each other or the Galactic center. #astronomy

M72: A Globular Cluster of Stars (Aug 19 2012) Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HPOW Explanation: Globular clusters once ruled the Milky Way. Back in the old days, back when our Galaxy first formed, perhaps thousands of globular clusters roamed our Galaxy. Today, there are less than 200 left. Many globular clusters were destroyed over the eons by repeated fateful encounters with each other or the Galactic center. #astronomy

May 2010 M72: A Globular Cluster of Stars Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HPOW Globular clusters once ruled the Milky Way. Back in the old days, back when our Galaxy first formed, perhaps thousands of globular clusters roamed our Galaxy. Today, there are less than 200 left. Pictured above by the Hubble Space Telescope are about 100,000 of M72's stars. M72, which spans about 50 LYrs & lies abt 50,000 LYrs away, can be seen w a small telescope 2ward the constellation of the Water Bearer (Aquarius).

May 2010 M72: A Globular Cluster of Stars Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HPOW Globular clusters once ruled the Milky Way. Back in the old days, back when our Galaxy first formed, perhaps thousands of globular clusters roamed our Galaxy. Today, there are less than 200 left. Pictured above by the Hubble Space Telescope are about 100,000 of M72's stars. M72, which spans about 50 LYrs & lies abt 50,000 LYrs away, can be seen w a small telescope 2ward the constellation of the Water Bearer (Aquarius).

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