A map of the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way

And you thought your day was busy? we-are-star-stuff: A map of our galaxy the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars. And yet our galaxy is a tiny place.

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observes the center of the globular cluster Messier 22, also known as M22.

Hubble Stares into the Crammed Center of Messier 22

The crammed centre of Messier 22 This image shows the centre of the globular cluster Messier also known as as observed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Messier 22 is one of about 150 globular clusters in the Milky Way and at just

Hubble Sees an Ancient Globular Cluster This image captures the stunning NGC 6535, a globular cluster 22,000 light-years away in the constellation of Serpens (The Serpent) that measures one light-year across.

Hubble Sees an Ancient Globular Cluster

This image captures the stunning NGC a globular cluster light-years away in the constellation of Serpens (The Serpent) that measures one light-year across. Globular clusters are tightly bound groups of stars which orbit galaxies.

Globular Cluster  Credit: NASA, ESA and H. Richer (University of British Columbia

all the stars in the sky. Globular Cluster NGC 6397 NASA ESA & H. Richer (university of British Columbia)

Hubble's Messier 9 Globular Cluster Photo-shows hundreds of thousands of glittering stars shine in a cluster at the center of our galaxy in a new photograph from the Hubble Space Telescope.

LOOK: Vast Star Cluster Shines In High-Res Hubble Telescope Image

Hubble Space Telescope photo taken March 16 of Messier 9 shows globular cluster of thousands of colorful stars — the blue stars are hotter while red stars are cooler. Messier 9 contains some of the oldest stars in the galaxy.

n-a-s-a: “  A map of our galaxy the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars ”

Map of Milky Way w pulsars (red), nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow) & orbits of several stars

Super Star Cluster #Westerlund2! This cluster is so massive that it is expected to eventually evolve into a globular cluster.  It hosts a dozen O-class hypergiant stars, each one with a luminosity 30,000 - 1,000,000 times greater than that of our Sun.

infinity-imagined: Super Star Cluster Westerlund This cluster is so massive that it is expected to eventually evolve into a globular cluster. It hosts a dozen O-class hypergiant stars, each one with a luminosity - times greater than that of our Sun.

This stellar swarm is M80 (NGC 6093), one of the densest of the 147 known globular star clusters in the Milky Way galaxy. Located about 28,000 light-years from Earth, M80 contains hundreds of thousands of stars, all held together by their mutual gravitational attraction. Globular clusters are particularly useful for studying stellar evolution, since all of the stars in the cluster have the same age (about 15 billion years), but cover a range of stellar masses.

They all go into the dark, the vacant interstellar spaces, the vacant into the vacant. Eliot, from The Complete Poems And Plays: 1909 - “Four Quartets”

M13: The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules (June 14 2012)  Image Credit & Copyright: Martin Pugh In 1716, English astronomer Edmond Halley noted, "This is but a little Patch, but it shews itself to the naked Eye, when the Sky is serene and the Moon absent." Of course, M13 is now modestly recognized as the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules, one of the brightest globular star clusters in the northern sky. Telescopic views reveal the spectacular cluster's hundreds of thousands of stars…

The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules Image Credit & Copyright: Martin Pugh

Globular Cluster NGC 6397

Globular Cluster NGC 6397

Globular cluster M12, captured by Madhup Rathi from Glen Allen, Virginia.

Globular cluster M12, captured by Madhup Rathi from Glen Allen, Virginia.

Messier 9 cluster: First discovered by Charles Messier in 1764, the globular cluster Messier 9 is a vast swarm of ancient stars located 25,000 light-years away, close to the center of the galaxy.   The cluster’s innermost stars have never been individually resolved - until now.   Hubble has captured the details of over 250,000 stars within it.  Most of Messier 9′s stars are nearly ten billion years old — twice the Sun’s age.

The Best Science Photos of the Week - March 17, 2012

Hubble's Messier 9 Globular Cluster Photo-shows hundreds of thousands of glittering stars shine in a cluster at the center of our galaxy in a new photograph from the Hubble Space Telescope.

Hubble Views the Globular Cluster M10 by NASA Goddard Photo and Video, via Flickr  -- this is so cool, Emma Smith

Star cluster Messier 10 lies about 15 000 light-years from Earth, in the constellation of Ophiuchus (The Serpent Bearer). At around 80 light-years across, it should appear about two-thirds the size of the moon.

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