Ellen Rykkelid
More ideas from Ellen
algae, Algae, Karlijn Sibbel, rotational molding, controling growth, growing products, Industry by Nature, industry by nature

algae, Algae, Karlijn Sibbel, rotational molding, controling growth, growing products, Industry by Nature, industry by nature

Ellen Rykkelid. Cellulose Cellphonecover: 'Dried bacterial cellulose has the strength, flexibility and structure as leather, and it will get a worn patina when used'

Cellulose Cellphonecover: 'Dried bacterial cellulose has the strength, flexibility and structure as leather, and it will get a worn patina when used'

Ellen Rykkelid: Growing products

Cellulose Cellphonecover [[MORE]]Dried bacterial cellulose has the strength, flexibility and structure as leather, and it will get a worn patina when used.

Ellen Rykkelid: 'Cellulose grown on beetroot'

Growing experimentation [[MORE]]I started growing cellulose using this recipe from biocouture, but wanted to see if the culture was able to grow on other medium than sweetened tea.

Ellen Rykkelid: 'How to easily grow bacterial cellulose'

How to easily grow bacterial cellulose [[MORE]]Here is how I prefer growing bacterial cellulose. The recipe is based on a cc-licensed recipe from biocouture, but I have done several modifications.

Ellen Rykkelid: 'Potato Packaging - discovered how easy it was growing on various kinds of waste like peel or overripe goods from fruit or vegetables, and even the plant itself'

Ellen Rykkelid: 'Potato Packaging - discovered how easy it was growing on various kinds of waste like peel or overripe goods from fruit or vegetables, and even the plant itself'

Hagfish slime contains protein threads that can be isolated, harvested, cultured and woven to create fabric that’s as strong as nylon or plastic. More efficient than silk from silkworms, and more sustainable than artificial fibers like polyester.

Unusual textile use: Hagfish thread (an eel of the deep sea) Eco Fabric: 14 Strange and Amazing Textile Innovations

3d print with living fungus

Studio Eric Klarenbeek most recent project is the myceliumchair, a chair in which printing and growing material are combined. Designer Eric Klarenbeek interest is combining materials in unexpected ways. Klarenbeek is exploring ways of making

IT’S NOT OVER, TILL IT’S OVER @Bauhaus – Weimar – November 13th 2014

Maurizio Montalti studio, Officina Corpuscoli, is researching the use of microorganisms such as fungus to produce alternative materials to plastic with amazing

microbial cellulose

This is my microbial skin grower. Inside it lives a micro organism, when you feed it, it creates a microbial cellulose structure.