Cecilie Moi
Flere idéer fra Cecilie
The Curse Girls

The Curse Girls

The Curse Girls

The Curse Girls

He is known to be a very accomplished fiddler who plays nature's powerful sound - the sound of the forest, the wind - everything can be heard quivering between violin strings. Fossegrimen are willing to teach his violin if one four Thursdays in a row comes with a juicy leg of lamb stolen from the neighbor's storehouse. This must be done in utmost secrecy. If, however, does not come with a good enough piece of meat to him, responds Fossegrimen with a poem/prose

He is known to be a very accomplished fiddler who plays nature's powerful sound - the sound of the forest, the wind - everything can be heard quivering between violin strings. Fossegrimen are willing to teach his violin if one four Thursdays in a row comes with a juicy leg of lamb stolen from the neighbor's storehouse. This must be done in utmost secrecy. If, however, does not come with a good enough piece of meat to him, responds Fossegrimen with a poem/prose

Huldra. A hulder is a seductive forest creature found in Scandinavian folklore. A multitude of places in Scandinavia are named after the Hulders, often places by legend associated with the presence of the "hidden folk".

Huldra. A hulder is a seductive forest creature found in Scandinavian folklore. A multitude of places in Scandinavia are named after the Hulders, often places by legend associated with the presence of the "hidden folk".

In Norse mythology, svartálfar (Old Norse "black elves", singular svartálfr) are beings who dwell in Svartálf[a]heimr (anglicized as Svartalfheim, "home of black-elves").[1] Both the svartálfar and Svartálfaheimr are primarily attested in the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. Scholars have noted that the svartálfar appear to be synonymous with dwarfs and potentially also the dökkálfar (Old Norse "dark elves").

In Norse mythology, svartálfar (Old Norse "black elves", singular svartálfr) are beings who dwell in Svartálf[a]heimr (anglicized as Svartalfheim, "home of black-elves").[1] Both the svartálfar and Svartálfaheimr are primarily attested in the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. Scholars have noted that the svartálfar appear to be synonymous with dwarfs and potentially also the dökkálfar (Old Norse "dark elves").

Google Image Result for http://thestifledartist.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/day-of-the-dead.jpg

Google Image Result for http://thestifledartist.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/day-of-the-dead.jpg

Vegvisirs

Vegvisirs

Bilderesultat for welsh love spoon symbols

Bilderesultat for welsh love spoon symbols

A basic introduction to Anglo-Saxon runes, a northern European writing system they imported into England.

A basic introduction to Anglo-Saxon runes, a northern European writing system they imported into England.

Runes liées (cliquer sur le lien pour en apprendre plus !)

Runes liées (cliquer sur le lien pour en apprendre plus !)